Identifying movie film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by htmlguru4242, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    I just found a movie camera at my grandparent's house, with a finished roll of film in it. Its on a metal spool (Double 8). However, I do not know what type of film it is, and id like to have it processed.

    SO
    The film has a tan emulsion (looks like 35mm ektachrome in color). There is a black anti-halo layer which rubs off VERY easily with a wet finger. The back of the film without the AH layer is greenish.

    In the film is punched "KOD 0-26359127

    I do not know when the film is from.

    Does anybody have any idea as to what it may be?
     
  2. ZorkiKat

    ZorkiKat Member

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    Kodachrome?
     
  3. dmr

    dmr Member

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    I'm sure that is most likely Kodachrome. We had a movie camera when I was a kid and that's what it used, on a double-width spool that you would run thru twice.

    If it's the real old stuff (like before 1960 or so) it's probably ASA/ISO 10 and if it's 60s or 70s vintage it's probably ASA/ISO 25.
     
  4. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    Ok, thans guys.

    How would I identify if its the current process or one of the older (K-12 or K-11) kodachromes?
     
  5. dmr

    dmr Member

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    Rocky Mountain Film Labs (www.rockymountainfilm.com) is the only one I know who even touches this stuff. They are obscenely ex$pen$ive and take months for turn-around and on some of the old Kodachromes all they can give you is B&W. :sad: I was once told that they were trying to come up with a process where they could do color development on the older Kodachromes again.
     
  6. egdinger

    egdinger Member

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    html you could do a snip test and dev it in B&W chems to get the edge info. It doesn't sound like it's kodachrome 25, I belive that had different info stamped into the end.

    On second thought I have no idea if movie films had edge info on them?
     
  7. pkerr

    pkerr Member

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    I would snip off a bit, develop it in your favourite B&W developer. Take a guess as to development time, say 5 minutes. See if you get anything. Snip off another piece modifying your development time to get more or less exposure. When you think you've got the best you can, develop the whole thing.

    I did that with some 30 year old Kodacolor X found in an old TLR. It's amazing that the latent image survived that long. I could almost read the year on the licence plate of this 50's car in one of the pictures. The person that owned the camera, or at least the daughter of the person that owned thecamera recognized some people as her OLD aunt and uncle.

    I think that's all that rockymountainfilm does since you only get B&W from colour film.

    Now how to split the film in 8mm and find a projector....
     
  8. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    That sounds like a good idea. Only issue with doing that is that I'll be cutting off frames from the beginning and end of the roll at the same time ... but, hey, there's 25 feet of it anyway.

    Are we looking at using a low, normal or high contrast developer here? Also, would the use of anti-fog be wise?

    Splitting the film will be interesting, but I do have a pair of projectors :smile: