Ilford Cinegram F film?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by John Wiegerink, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. John Wiegerink

    John Wiegerink Member

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    What was Ilford 35mm perforated Cinegram "F" film and when was it discontinued? JohnW
     
  2. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    A film for cine radiography (X-ray) use. The only reference I can find on a quick search is in a patent for X-ray equipment in 1947, so it's clearly an older product.
     
  3. John Wiegerink

    John Wiegerink Member

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    Well, I had very little luck tracking down info on the film also, but did come up with this interesting find. In my search I found several references to a heart surgery/examine a talking about what showed up on certain frames of "Ilford Cinegram" film in relationship to the heart going through it's beating cycle. I assume they were using some kind of movie imaging to study the heart valves in action and Cinegram was the film used. I then thought it had to be xray film, but didn't know. JohnW
     
  4. AgX

    AgX Member

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    I assume the largest use of X-ray cinematography in the past being in the medical field. This also means the use of amplifying foils and thus a orthochromatic film.
     
  5. Simon R Galley

    Simon R Galley Subscriber

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    We did indeed make cineradiography film until fairly recently, I believe the last film sold was in the early 2000's

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :
     
  6. John Wiegerink

    John Wiegerink Member

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    Is there a way to process/develop/expose this stuff so to use for possible landscapes or something similar?
     
  7. MartinP

    MartinP Member

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    Try snipping off about 20cm in the dark then chop that in half. Put half straight in a dilute developer for five minutes then fix and wash - see what, if anything, is edge printed on the film and look at the amount of fog. This may help date what you have and decide if it is worth going further. The undeveloped piece of film can be examined closely to see if it is gelatin-coated both sides, has emulsion both sides and so on - that may help you with the practicalities of using the material.
     
  8. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    These were high speed films used to photograph fluoroscopic screens. They were frequently used in the past in heart diagnostics and studies (now mostly replaced by ultrasound techniques). To match the screens, they were mostly sensitive to blue and blue-green. Several other manufacturers made similar films. Kodak Cinefluor comes to mind.