Ilford Delta in HC110

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Shootar401, Jun 1, 2013.

  1. Shootar401

    Shootar401 Member

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    Has anybody ever developed Delta 100 in HC110?

    I ran a few rolls of it through my RZ and forgot I didn't have any DD-X left. It's always been my developer for the Delta films, but I figured I'd give it a shot in HC-110 since I have loads of it laying around.

    I developed in dilution H and since no times were published for that dilution I guessed at 9 minutes and went for it. All I can say is WOW! Delta 100 & HC100 gives some great SHARP negatives. I'd say easily on par with T-grain developers. Definitely going to be my new combo from now on.

    I'm going to shoot a few sheets of Delta in 5x7 and try it in a tray to see if I can replicate the results.
     
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  2. rwreich

    rwreich Subscriber

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    I looked for published times and only found dilution B & E. All the different variations really turn me off from experimenting. I like knowing why something works when I use it.
     
  3. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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  4. Sal Santamaura

    Sal Santamaura Member

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    What's a "T-grain developer?"
     
  5. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    A T-grain developer is one that is specifically formulated to work with T-grain emulsions such as Ilford Delta and Kodak Tmax.
     
  6. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

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    I've found it to be a great combination. I developed my shots in a tray for 9 minutes in Dilution E, and got beautiful results. The one big thing I noticed about this combination is that it's really sensitive to changes in agitation and time. Smaller changes seem to be needed to expand your range, at least so far this has been my experience.
     
  7. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    Then use Dilution B.
     
  8. Sal Santamaura

    Sal Santamaura Member

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    Delta emulsions are core-shell technology, not T-grain. Kodak uses T grains.

    That aside, referring to developers in a way that implies they're "for" these specific emulsion types, and conversely implying they're "not for" cubic grain emulsions, is neither standard practice nor wise. Any black and white film developer can be used with any black and white negative film. Results from various combinations thereof range from very bad to excellent, irrespective of what the developer is called or was allegedly intended for. Trying them out is the only way to determine suitability of negatives for a given purpose/taste.

    Kodak screwed up when naming its TMAX and TMAX-RS developers. As a result, people have been confused ever since. :smile:
     
  9. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Not according to information on the web.

    "Tabular-grain film is a type of photographic film that includes nearly all color films, T-MAX films from Kodak (with Kodak's T-grain emulsion), Delta films from Ilford Photo and the Fujifilm Neopan films. The silver halide crystals in the film emulsion are flatter and more tabular (hence T-Grain)."

    Unfortunately things are not usually named by scientists or engineers but by marketing weasels.
     
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  10. Hexavalent

    Hexavalent Subscriber

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    Tabular grains can also be core-shell. There are patents that describe the combination of crystal technologies.

    IIRC, "T-Grain" is a Kodak trademark - other manufacturers use different names: 'Tabular' is the generic term.
     
  11. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    TMax and Delta films are tabular grain films.

    Tabular grain developer? Well, some people claim it is better to use developers with less solvent action. One could also make the argument they don't particularly require "fine grain" development sinve they are inherently more fine grained than more traditional films. On the other hand, neither Kodak or Ilford recommend anything more special than D-76/ID-11, or XTOL (in Kodak's case), to get the maximum quality out of their respective tabular grain films. I'd tend to go with what they say.
     
  12. Sal Santamaura

    Sal Santamaura Member

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  13. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    And conversely, you can certainly use developers marketed for new tech films with old tech films. I use T-Max RS regularly for other films, because it's convenient, I've been using it for years and it works well.

    There's absolutely nothing special about some developers that make them work better with old tech or new tech films except, as mentioned above, that newer films tend to be finer grained so relatively grainier developers can be used for their other benefits if desired without excess graininess.
     
  14. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    I have also found that I don't care for T-Max films in Diafine where I like it a lot with most older films. I could conjecture about why but would no doubt be wrong, and told so. :wink: However it does "work" it just doesn't get the effective speed I see with older films. It can still be useful for compensation.
     
  15. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    An example of a developer specifically designed for tabular grain films would be Crawley's FX-37.
     
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  16. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Of course both Harmon and Ilford have a dog in the fight and patents to defend. They would be touchy about terminology. Still no matter what the technology is called it is usually all lumped under the term tabular grain.

    Xerox Corporation for many years tried to stop the use of xerox as a verb. This was an attempt to defend their trade name. They failed and people are free to say "I xeroxed that document" without fear of lawsuit.
     
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  17. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    I thought only the Neopan Acros was tabular type and supposedly a "hybrid" at that, or so I've read. I'm pretty sure the Neopan 400, Neopan 1600 and certainly the Neopan 100SS are not. But who knows if any, even the Neopan 400, is even made anymore....I guess Acros is.