Ilford Ortho Plus

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by EASmithV, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hey All,

    Just got a box of Ortho Plus in 4x5, and can't wait to try it out.
    I'm wondering if anyone has some advice on shooting it.
    I plan to shoot it at ISO 100 (or even better, 200) and develop in Rodinal or HC-110.

    Dev times anyone? Sample Photos? :whistling:
     
  2. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,537
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    I have used this in the darkroom, but not in camera. Just remember it has limited spectrum sensitivity.
     
  3. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,289
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    northern Pa.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Why would you shoot it at 100 when its rated at 80 in daylight and 40 for tungsten? Just remember, it has no red sensitivity, and portraits with it will show skin as dark, and show every pore.
     
  4. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

    Messages:
    2,223
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    Regina, SK,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I agree about the EI. If you want to shoot at ISO 200, get a film that is designed for it. Foma 200 is pretty nice film if you can get it, or you can shoot Tri-X at EI 200-250 if you adjust development accordingly.
     
  5. skahde

    skahde Member

    Messages:
    427
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Why would one want to shoot Ortho in the field? A blue filter with panchromatic film will do the same thing. This stuff can do nice tricks in the lab, though as you can safely handle it under red light.
     
  6. Larry H-L

    Larry H-L Subscriber

    Messages:
    102
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I use it in the field now and then. With a yellow filter looks much like regular B&W film. Easy to load and develop in lab with red lights on. I have a few posted over at LF photo from 4x5 and 8x10.
     
  7. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    To address questions:

    I like the look of ortho tones.
    I like the grain structure of ortho films, which cannot be replicated with filtration.
    Filtration is annoying for handheld use in my SLR.
    Foma 200 is a great film, but it is not ortho.
    I like even ASA ratings for the most part, and that extra 1/3rd stop could help for handheld use.

    C'mon guys, you all are being as bad as Kodak recommending T-Max as a replacement for everything... Where is your sense of adventure?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 29, 2013
  8. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,522
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The grain structure of Ilford Ortho Plus is similar to FP4, I used both very extensively, that can't be changed by filtration.

    Ian
     
  9. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,289
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    northern Pa.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    To replicate pan film with ortho, use a green filter to darken the sky. If you dont use a filter, the sky will print out as white with no cloud distinction. Red, orange, and yellow filters have little to no effect. Underexposing ortho film won't gain you any advantages, just underexposed film. I've shot two boxes of Ortho+ 4x5 so far and it does not have the exposure latitude of pan films.
     
  10. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Well, I just shot a test sheet, a portrait of my brother who has skin issues, to highlight the film's strengths and weaknesses.
    As said above, it does seem to make the skin issues more evident, but we'll see what it looks like in positive.

    However, saying that it will not push to 200 is incorrect, I had very good results. Details to follow.
     
  11. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

    Messages:
    2,058
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Not quite true. Although this idea has been proposed over the past 30 or so years, the results of a blue filter with panchromatic film come close but are not identical to those of orthochromatic film. I never leave home without some of each loaded in holders, often Tri-X Ortho and HP5+. No, Tri-X Ortho is not available and has not been for many years. The ability of ortho films to open up the shadows is much superior to that of filtered pan films.
     
  12. rorye

    rorye Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,151
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I'm looking forward to seeing the results.
    I've been playing with Rollei Ortho and I just love it.
     
  13. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

    Messages:
    2,223
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    Regina, SK,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I say go for it - I would like to try some ortho film at some time. I just don't agree with underexposing it. Shoot it at its rated ISO (or run exposure tests to determine your personal EI) for best results. Cameras don't care if ISOs are "even" or not.
     
  14. ME Super

    ME Super Member

    Messages:
    1,151
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2011
    Location:
    Central Illi
    Shooter:
    35mm
    You can shoot at a different ISO if you push or pull process

    I have to respectfully disagree. I normally shoot slide film, which has next to no exposure latitude (yes, I know this is a B&W forum). I wanted some 400 speed Provia (400X) to shoot my son's birthday party, and the local camera store, Creve Coeur Camera, didn't have any. I did the next best thing. Grabbed a roll of Provia 100F out of the fridge, wrote on the film cassette "Push 2 stops", loaded it in the camera and shot it at ISO 320. Took it to Creve Coeur Camera and told them to have the lab push 2 stops, and the pictures turned out just fine. I dare say they turned out comparable to shooting at box speed.
     
  15. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

    Messages:
    2,223
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    Regina, SK,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You can get decent quality pushing film, but you will always lose shadow detail. Always better to shoot a film of the appropriate speed than to shoot a slower speed film with push processing.
     
  16. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I only developed 1 sheet so far to see if my dev time was good, and it was. The neg is thin, but not underexposed thin, it almost looks like staining developer thin. My Brother's skin looks worse in person, to the acne issue wasn't as bad as i was expecting.

    This is a straight scan. The skin looks almost metallic!
    8602358920_2e509363b1_c.jpg

    here's the info:
    Handheld 4x5
    Graflex RB Super D
    190mm Ektar f/4.5
    Ilford Ortho Plus rated @ ISO 200
    Adonal (Rodinal) 1:100 for 20 minutes at 70 degrees, shake agitation every 4 mins
    1/60th at f/8.5
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 29, 2013
  17. Michael R 1974

    Michael R 1974 Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,200
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Ca
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wow that came out pretty good considering you rated it at 200. I've always wanted to try this film for masking but never got around to it.
     
  18. skahde

    skahde Member

    Messages:
    427
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You certainly have a point here as the sensitivity added to the silverhalide through the sensitizing dyes will hardly ever exactly match the spectrum removed by filtration. If done right it can be done but if you want to have the same exact effect as using ortho, using the right film is certainly more straightforward.

    This reminds me of my experiences with using tungsten film which I could never quite match by using daylight fim and filtration, but I could get close.
     
  19. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    here's more

    8617806983_b59d42f9ca_c.jpg

    Handheld 4x5
    Graflex RB Super D
    190mm Ektar f/4.5
    Ilford Ortho Plus rated @ ISO 200
    Rodinal 1:100 for 20 minutes at 70

    :wink:
     
  20. premortho

    premortho Member

    Messages:
    47
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2012
    Location:
    Bombay, NY
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Well, I must say that I was amazed to read that yellow filtration had no effect on Ortho film. The information put out for 75 years must have been all wrong, I guess. Actually, I have found that the response of ortho film to filtration can give beautiful results. Just look in a Kodak master photoguide from the early fifties to get the exposure compensation factors needed. If you use a 2X yellow filter, you expose your 200 number to get the same negative density: e.g. 50. If you use 80 as your starting number, expose at 20 with a 2X yellow. And if you think 20 is too slow, well, that's what tripods are for. Ortho film has a tonality all it's own. I've been shooting it since 1945. I would still be shooting it in rollfilm cameras if it was available.
     
  21. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,968
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Location:
    Sweden/Germany
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I've got one example in my gallery and yes, it is a great film. Unfortunately a bit too expensive for me to burn through loads of it, but I still have one box left in the cupboard. I love its ability to, as Jim says, open up the shadows.
     
  22. dr5chrome

    dr5chrome Member

    Messages:
    463
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Shooter:
    Medium Format