Ilford Pan F+ 50 First Timer

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by bvy, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. bvy

    bvy Subscriber

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    My wife, not a photographer, bought this film for me for my birthday (Ilford Pan F Plus 50, 35mm). She said she bought it because the reviews sounded good. It's nothing I would have chosen to shoot -- not yet. But I'm up for a challenge.

    I'm thinking I'll load it in my Yashica T5 (T4 Super) and take some headshots of my family and other loved ones. This is slow film, so I think these portraits will have to be outdoors. I know the T4/T5 is known to have a (relatively) bright flash (so Terry Richardson would make us believe). But is it bright enough to use indoors or in suboptimal lighting? Will the flash add anything indoors? What I don't have a good understanding of is how film speed and on-camera flash work together. I seem to remember reading that the T4/T5 flash is "optimized" for 400 speed film.

    Also, I have D76 on hand, but I have an itching to try developing it in Perceptol. I've read that Perceptol also works well with Neopan Acros 100, which I have a good supply of.

    Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    Shoot at box speed and follow the instruction sheet.
     
  3. Pioneer

    Pioneer Member

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    I use this in 35mm and 120 and I like it. I have used it indoors but it is actually more of an outdoor film for me. It holds up really well to contrasty scenes, especially when developed in Rodinal 1:50. If you don't develop your own, send it to DR5 Chrome and they will do it right. A little expensive but certainly worth it.

    I love using this film to take shots of my family during our summer picnics at the park, they come out very good. Try it out, I think you will enjoy how it handles bright sunlight.
     
  4. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    In my experience, XTOL produces nice pictures with Pan F+.

    If you find the contrast to be a little harsh, slow your agitation down.
    Manufacturer's instructions say to use 5 inversions/agitations per 10 seconds instead of the usual 5-in-5 but I have been advised by a certain someone from Ilford that an even gentler agitation scheme might be useful.

    Personally, I like the "brassy" look of Pan F+ so I don't usually try to cut contrast very much.

    I find that this film likes a lot of light. By that, I don't mean that it takes more light to expose it correctly. I mean something like a bright, sunny day or a bright day with overcast skies.

    I shot some really nice pictures indoors with direct sunlight coming through a large picture window at about 4:00 in the afternoon.

    You shouldn't have any problem shooting Pan F+ outdoors any time from late morning/early afternoon through golden hour on any day when it's sunny.
     
  5. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    It's a great film. Go shoot some landscapes with it; in my opinion that's what it's best at. You could also do urban photography with it in good light, particularly with reasonably fast lenses.

    The grain is very fine and it prints beautifully.
     
  6. Tony-S

    Tony-S Member

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    Yeah, I like Pan F+ at ISO 25 then developed in Perceptol 1+2 at 72F for 11 min. Brings out the shadows and retains the highlights. I also use Perceptol 1+2 at 72F for 16 min with Acros at 100 ISO. I prefer Pan F+ for landscapes/architecture and Acros for people pics.
     
  7. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Be careful with this film as it builds contrast very rapidly in some developers. I personally do not consider it an ISO 50 film and shoot it at less and develop it in D-23 1+1.
     
  8. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    Agree it's lovely film and builds contrast quickly. Be careful with D76 - an ok combination but do NOT overdevelop.

    I really like it in Diafine. I shoot it at box speed or EI 64. Superb combo. This is 6x6 PanF+ in Diafine:

    [​IMG]
    Apalachicola Beach 1 by Roger Cole, on Flickr
     
  9. Double Negative

    Double Negative Member

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    I love this film, especially in Xtol 1:1 and in medium format. Very smooth and detailed.
     
  10. Felinik

    Felinik Member

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    +1 on that, I develop PAN-F 50 with rodinal/r09 1:100 stand dev. 60 mins, and the result is always great! (I'm shooting 99% outdoors).
     
  11. TareqPhoto

    TareqPhoto Member

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    It is one of my Ilford favorite films, and i think it is the only ISO50 film i like, just know how to shoot it and then develop it, i did once with Ilfosol 3 even not perfect combo maybe but i've got decent nice results, and TMAX even done a better job, not so perfect with D-76 so i will avoid it for this film.

    Good luck, and show us the result when you do.
     
  12. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Pan F is a beautiful film and I develop it at 68F/20C for 14 minutes in D76 at 1:1
     
  13. IloveTLRs

    IloveTLRs Member

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    I find it a FANTASTIC film and always keep a bulk roll on ice (135.)

    Even though it's ASA 50 film, I shoot it in on everything from sunny to rainy days, in the evenings, and in poor light on purpose. I've found it great for long night shots of 20 ~ 30 seconds, too.

    I found it to be ho-hum in D-76, pretty good in HC-110 and gorgeous in Rodinal. I don't do things scientifically though, so Your Mileage May Vary, etc.
     
  14. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Bvy: If you have D76 on hand it will work very well at 1+1 with Pan F. As Gerald says, it Is inherently a fairly contrasty film so be careful not to overdevelop. If you prefer rich shadow detail I suggest rating it at EI 25 and giving somewhat softer than normal development.

    Perceptol will work best with this film (and Acros) at 1+3. However note that to get maximum quality out of Perceptol it is imperative to accept its speed loss of at least one stop - regardless of dilution. It is not really a compensating developer, even at 1+3 with reduced agitation, and if you try to get box speed out of it you'll just end up with grainy negatives. Same goes for Acros (or any other film for that matter).

    Pan F is pretty fine grained so if you have D-76 go with it.
     
  15. zsas

    zsas Member

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    Your wife has great taste! I bulk load it and shoot it at 25 with a medium yellow filter (K2) for all types of light and find it a joy...