Ilford SFX 200

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by WillMcC, May 16, 2013.

  1. WillMcC

    WillMcC Member

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    Has anybody shot with this without a filter?
    Has anyone got some photos they're willing to share of the results?
    I've not shot with it before, was curious as to the results.
    Am I right in thinking that it'll come out just like a regular expensive B and W film as it's not a true InfraRed film?
    Kind regards,
    Will.
     
  2. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    I don't have any scanned to share but yes it looks very normal shot without filters.
     
  3. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    It's grainy compared to the contemporary usual suspects (Tri-X, TMax xxx, HP5,FP4), which gives it a bit of an "old school" look.
     
  4. IloveTLRs

    IloveTLRs Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2013
  5. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber

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  6. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    It's a really great portrait film. Its grain is beautiful, and I would like to imagine that its slightly extended red sensitivity helps skin tones.

    Why not purchase a few rolls and try it out on the subject matter you like? Discover its possibilities by changing your technique with exposure, different lighting scenarios, different developing times, etc. Print a few of the negatives, and then judge for yourself.
     
  7. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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  8. hoshisato

    hoshisato Member

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    Indeed, a bit grainier than HP5+, IMO. I normally use it with the Hoya R72 filter as I prefer to shoot the cheaper FP4+/HP5+ for "normal" shots.
     
  9. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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  10. Robert Ley

    Robert Ley Subscriber

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    How does one shoot this film with an IR filter such as the Hoya R72? Any problems with a dark red filter?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  11. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    A dark red filter will produce minimal IR effect. In order to fully bring it out, it's best to use the SFX filter that Ilford makes (I think they still make it), which lets through only a narrow band of wavelengths to hit the sweet spot of the film.
    You'd have to be on a tripod, and use a meter as if the film was around ISO 1 to ISO 3 or so, and then bracket. Like with any IR film you will soon learn what works and what doesn't.

    I hope that helps.
     
  12. Tony-S

    Tony-S Member

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    The Cokin 007 is the same filter.
     
  13. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    I use a generic Chinese clone of the R72 (720nm lowpass) and SFX comes out well at EI2 with that filter.

    I also found that TTL metering with my Dynax 5 worked fine through the filter with this film (DX box speed 200) - your results will vary with the spectral sensitivity of your camera's meter so you might need to apply a consistent adjustment, e.g. by forcing the camera's ISO setting to something else.
     
  14. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    My entry in the Ilford APUG contest a few years ago was shot on unfiltered SFX 200.

    The slightly different spectral response is interesting to work with.
     

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  15. Truzi

    Truzi Subscriber

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    I've only shot a couple rolls, and do not have an IR filter (sorry, don't have a scanner to post pictures).

    I really like SFX. It does look like "normal" B&W without a filter, but seems to have a different "feel" to it.
     
  16. Robert Ley

    Robert Ley Subscriber

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    Thanks for the exposure info on this film. I shot a few rolls of this film years ago, but forgot how I shot it. I have found a few frozen rolls of 120 that I think I might like to try and will probably try to process it in Thornton's two bath developer. Any other processing suggestions?


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  17. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    It fogs pretty quickly once expired, even frozen. You might want to give it an extra stop.