ilford sfx, filters or no

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by jim appleyard, Apr 27, 2005.

  1. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    I recenlty picked up the last two rolls of Ilford SFX at the camera store and I'd like to go to a ghost town near here and shoot the abandoned and falling down old houses. Do you users of this film still recommend the use of red filters even tho' there will be no sky, just old buildings, in the photos.
     
  2. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    If you don't use a fairly strong red filter, your results will look a lot like HP-5 or, FP-4.
     
  3. colrehogan

    colrehogan Member

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    To get the IR effect with this film, I use an R72 (Wratten 89B) filter.
     
  4. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    Well, I've got #'s 25 and 29 for my red filters. I guess that'll have to do.
     
  5. Terence

    Terence Member

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    I use a #25 with good results. Weathered wood and half rusty/half shiny metal are where SFX shines for me (since black skies aren't an option for you.).
     
  6. panchromatic

    panchromatic Member

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    in my part of town(country) the SFX sits on our shelves...

    maybe i should pick some up and try it.
     
  7. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    That's good news. I'm photographing the old buildings at Adirondac (ghost town) and the place just screams for b/w. I thought the SFX would be just different enough. Thanks.
     
  8. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Jim, check here: http://www.ilford.com/html/us_english/prod_html/sfx200/sfx200.html
    A 25 filter (RED) helps with SFX, even though they reccomend a deep red filter for maximum effect.

    Panchromatic: Lucky you!
    here it dissapeared from the shelves right after the Ilford news hit.....
    PS. if you find a good deal send me some :wink:
     
  9. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    After the Ilford scare, all the SFX200 quickly disappeared from local shelves here too. It seems to have been recently restocked however...with a whopping 50% price increase. Now $12 per roll of 135-36exp.
     
  10. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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  11. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Ilford SFX filters or no

    As stated by another member, SFX without a red filter will look a lot like HP5+ or FP4+. The advantage is that the film is in that sense dual purpose and can be loaded in subdued light as it is extended red sensitivity not true infrared. However the downside is that, based admittedly on my one and only experience of using it, then unless the sky is included and even then it has to be a sunny day then a red filter makes little difference to the appearance of the picture i.e. compared to Kodak the white ghostly effect on foliage is hardly noticeable. The other ghostly effect provided by Kodak's lack of anti-halation backing is of course also missing.

    However in the right sunny conditions the effect is clearly infrared like, giving an effect which causes the print viewer to wonder whether it is brilliant sunlight or brilliant moonlight and creates that slightly ghostlike atmosphere which brilliant moonlight does .
     
  12. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

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    The first few rolls of SFX that I shot were with a Hoya R72 filter and they had excellent IR effects--black skies, white foliage, etc. I later shot several rolls of flower close-ups using #15, #25 and #29 filters and got no IR effect. That's been my only experience with this film. Your experience may be different.
     
  13. Bob F.

    Bob F. Member

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    Get it while you can... now discontinued by Ilford (I know lots of us already know that, but I thought I'd mention it...).

    Bob.
     
  14. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Ilford sfx,filters or no

    I had a look at High Milsom's book on Infra red "Infrared Photography A Complete Workshop Guide" which is a UK publication. I find it more comprehensive than Laurie Hayball's book "Advanced Infrared Photography Handbook". However each seems to back up your experience of filters which largely is mine also. The problem with a Hoya 72 is that to get the better infrared effect than with a Number 25 or 29 Red the exposures have to be so long that a tripod is probably necessary.

    If you want to use SFX without a 72 filter and be able to handhold then you have to accept a very limited infrared effect usually only apparent on sunny days and with a lot of sky. Overall Kodak HIE is preferred by both authors for its effect. However in the UK Kodak HIE is a lot more expensive than Ilfor SFX

    Pentaxuser
     
  15. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    I was looking at the Ilford Data Guide and realized Delta 3200 has also "extended" red sensitivity up to 680nm or so

    Anybody used Delta 3200 with a Red 29 filter?
     
  16. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    To get the IR look, you need an IR filter. Someone recommended the 89B which should be good. I use a B+W 092. Regular color filters make it look like regular black and white.

    Experiment before going. The chance of sucess with film speed and processing and the correct filter factor and metering are almost nil.
     
  17. Simon E

    Simon E Member

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  18. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    Ilford acutally made SFX filters. They were about $12US. I still have a couple laying around somewhere. They are equivalent to an 89b. I finally got some good IR results with an asa of 6, so yes, a tripod was necessary.
     
  19. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    I'm going to hijack my own thread here. There's another question about IR film floating at this moment and someone asked about doing IR film with staining devs. Anyone ever try SFX in a pyro/pyrocat dev? Times & temps?
     
  20. blanco_y_negro

    blanco_y_negro Member

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    SFX

    I have recently shot a roll of Ilford SFX hoping to get some IR effect but was somewhat disappointed. However, I used only Heliopan 25 and 29 filters. With these filters you get decent tones, especially on weathered wood, as pointed out earlier, but nothing like Kodak's IR film. Basically, my impression is that SFX is a good b&w film with fine grain. I checked the film with Schneider 6x loupe and found finer grain on SFX than on Fortepan 200. My developer was D76.
     
  21. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    I just burned my last rolls of SFX200 with a 89B filter.
    A crude digital picture of one of my proofs is here:
    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=10547

    I was surprised at how well it worked with fall foliage.

    Also the use of a rangefinder made composing so much easier. i set the light meter to EI12 for calculating exposure.

    developed in DDX 1+6 (ran out of DDX and couldn't make a standard dilution) for about 15 minutes.
     
  22. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    Thanks. I've been using my supply with an R72 and I like what is does for foliage; not much of a change on anything else however. I'll someday get around to posting a portrait I did this way. Cool! Been souping it in HC-110 and Rodinal.