Infrared Look

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by TPPhotog, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

    Messages:
    3,042
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I seem to remember from the dark pit where my brain should be that using a Polarizing filter and Red filter together with a standard black and white film produces an infrared look.

    Does anyone remember anything like this or have experince of trying it?

    Tony
     
  2. Les McLean

    Les McLean Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,609
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2002
    Location:
    Northern Eng
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Red and Polariser together will give you the dramatic skies associated with infra red when there are white clouds in a blue sky. From memory I think you need to allow about 5 stops in compensation for the filters. You can further increase the contrast by under exposing and increasing development which will probably increase the grain.
     
  3. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

    Messages:
    3,042
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thank you Les I'm in your debt once again. I'll give it a try as soon as we get some good light and a sky full of clouds which could be anytime with the weather conditions here at the moment.
    Tony
     
  4. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

    Messages:
    3,894
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    Middle Engla
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I've used the combination as an emergency neutral density set and have never notice any infrared enharncement. So I think the short answer to this is a simple no!
    As Les says the use of these two filters together will dramatically darken blue skys, but they will not effect green in the same way that infrared film does.
     
  5. roy

    roy Member

    Messages:
    1,308
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    West Sussex
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Dramatic contrast yes, but I canot visualise the 'bleaching' effect on the greens.
     
  6. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

    Messages:
    1,325
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Location:
    Louisiana, U
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's "kinda" an infrared effect but it depends on the light. To me, it's more of an interesting night-time effect that can be done at noon.
     
  7. bjorke

    bjorke Member

    Messages:
    2,032
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    Location:
    SF & Surroun
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Really depends on what you're shooting -- skies, foliage, people... To test, shoot some bracketed color frames with the polarizer, drop them into photoshop (or similar) and examine the individual RGB color layers. Do any of them look sort of like what you want for this subject? Then using that as a guide choose an appropriate filter and tweak the development is whichever direction you feel would be most appropriate (for an IRE look, go grainy and contrasty). Of course, by the time you're done testing you might have had time to scare-up some proper IR film :smile:
     
  8. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    8,003
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Milan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Bjorke, discribes how I've created faux B&W IR effects from digital RGB files.
     
  9. jim kirk jr.

    jim kirk jr. Member

    Messages:
    743
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter:
    35mm
    One note on the red/polarizer combo.In my experience at least the polarizing effect with a wide lens is not consistent over the whole sky so the sky may not be uniformly black.Of course alot has to do with the position of the sun-usually at 90 degrees is best.
     
  10. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

    Messages:
    3,042
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Many thanks for the additional advice everyone. Les did say the combo should give me "the dramatic skies associated with infra red when there are white clouds in a blue sky" and not mention foliage btw :smile: Since I made the posting we've had nothing but flat light around here but when I have the conditions I'll give it a try and see what happens. Might even pick up a couple of real IR when I have the change as Bjorke suggested :wink:

    I'm trying to stay away from PS as much as possible which is why my neg scanner is up for sale in the other forum (shameless plug warning - any reasonable offers considered btw folks :smile: ). From now on it's flatbed of my wet prints only to post up here and to finally get around to updating my tatty site LOL
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2004
  11. glbeas

    glbeas Member

    Messages:
    3,307
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2002
    Location:
    Roswell, Ga.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've shot true infrared even on flat lighting days and gotten good detail in the clouds, not seen in the visible. The infrared look has a lot to do with how IR is scattered or not depending on what it hits. There is no scattering in a clear sky, hence the ultra darkness of it, but water vapor scatters it strongly so accentuates cloud traces almost unseen in the sky. Vegetations chlorophyll reflects it strongly so live leaves glow while dead leaves dont. It's not even the green color that does it because I've seen plants with other colors turn just as white. Many dyes are transparent to it, film dyes are for example seen by using two layers of unexposed and processed Ektachrome as an IR filter. Thats where the see through clothing scandal came about with the Sony video night shot cams. Many synthetic clothing dyes are no better, turning sheer at the drop of a filter. Infrared portraits are interesting in that the light penetrates the skin to a degree and you can trace veins underneath fairly easily. Helps with that soft waxy look you get.