Iniciation to stain developers!

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Rhodes, Dec 27, 2012.

  1. Rhodes

    Rhodes Member

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    I find myself wanting to try satin developers to develop sheet film and possible also roll. Want to ask wich one of the several stain developers is more "newbie friendly" and easy to mix/use, as a concentrated developer that it is only need to dilute and use (like rodinal and etc).
    Having also the normal safety precaution, what are the less toxic or dangerous ones?
    For developing sheet, I am still looking if I will develop in trays or in tanks, but possibly it will be in tanks!
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Staining developers are always twompart. The best to start off with is Pyrocat HD, it's like Rodinal on steroids.

    Ian
     
  3. aleksmiesak

    aleksmiesak Member

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    I love Pyrocat HD! It's my go-to regular film developer and produces stunning negatives. And if you get it mixed with glycol it will last significantly longer. The DI water version has a pretty short shelf life. I know the Formulary in the US sells pyrocat in liquid or dry kits. But I know nothing about international shipping costs.

    Good luck!
     
  4. paul_c5x4

    paul_c5x4 Subscriber

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    Nearly all are two part, but there are a couple that are not. 510-pyro is one. Fairly easy to mix from raw chemicals, economical in use (anything from 1+100 to 1+500), and excellent keeping properties - Downside is Triethanolamine is not easy to find. Unless you have access to the raw ingredients to make your own developer solution, I'd suggest something like the Moersch Tanol. If you can find Pyrocat-HD premixed in Europe, then certainly give it a go as there is a lot more data available than some of the other formulas.

    Caffinol is another one that is often overlooked - Might be worth a try.
     
  5. Rhodes

    Rhodes Member

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    Yes, I know they are two parts, i just used the example of a concentrated dev, because I want one that is liquid and just pour x ml of solution 1, y ml of 2, etc.
    I can look for it, besides tanol their is also finol. If the moersch stain devs are "easy" to use, I will go for it.
     
  6. K-G

    K-G Subscriber

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  7. thefizz

    thefizz Subscriber

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    I recommend Moersch Tanol.
     
  8. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Staining developers contain either pyrogallol or catechol, both are more toxic than metol or hydroquinone. Use of rubber gloves is recommended. Skin absorption of catechol has been linked to chronic kidney disease.
     
  9. Rhodes

    Rhodes Member

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    Thanks Karl-Gustaf!

    Yes, I am aware about the toxicity of the chemicals. But can normal latex gloves, the ones that one buys in packs of 100 and are disposable be use as protection against pyrogallol and catechol?
     
  10. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Latex gloves have two drawbacks. Many people are allergic to latex and develop a rash. Latex is not impervious to some chemicals. A better choice would be the blue nitrile gloves.

    Anyone who wishes to mix up their own staining developers should also wear a dust mask when dealing with solid pyrogallol or catechol (pyrocatechin). In addition to handling the solids, catechol has a measureable vapor pressure at 20oC and should be handled with good ventilation to avoid breathing the vapor. It has a distinctive medicinal smell. From the catechol MSDS, "Acute animal tests in rats, mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits have demonstrated catechol to have high acute toxicity by oral or dermal exposure." In the early days of photography when pyrogallol was the major developing agent, many photographers died from liver or kidney failure.

    It is interesting to note that both catechol and hydroquinone are dihydroxybenzenes C6H4(OH)2. However the toxicity of the two chemicals is quite different. Hydroquinone is moderately tomic while catechol is quite toxic. What a difference just from the relative positions of the two hydroxyl groups.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 28, 2012