Is it possible over-agitate lith prints?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by clayne, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. clayne

    clayne Member

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    I've been recently experimenting with the Fotospeed Dev A/B kit, using both Ilford MGWT and Agfa MCP - both RC.

    Of the few I've spent 10+ minutes developing, I've noticed a strange "cloudy" effect in the image. Literally it looks like clouds overlaying the original image. Is this caused by too vigorous initial agitation?

    Also, I've noticed that when I had a relatively hotter dev temp (say 30C or so) the MGWT ripped through the developer and had developed in almost 30 seconds. Way too fast. Then when I went back to 20C or so temperatures, it took forever to develop - I eventually had to pull the print because it just didn't look like it was going to happen completely. The tone was nice, an almost citrus orange (both MGWT and MCP), but when I upped the temp again, the MGWT was a pretty unattractive green.

    I realize that things are unpredictable with lith - but I can't even seem to get in the ballpark.
     
  2. Guillaume Zuili

    Guillaume Zuili Member

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    That cloudy effect is normal. Basically you see the middle tone coming up this way. It's like a fogging. Cloud disappear when blacks are showing up.
    I use fiber only. Can't tell but warmer solution helps to get it faster. RC might go too fast because it's RC...
     
  3. heart of stone

    heart of stone Member

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    I give my prints continuous agitation throughout their 25 min. of development. Fiber, never tried RC. I did try heating the developer. Shortened the time considerably but I didn't like the tones it produced.
    Keep at it, like everything else there's a learning curve. Keep notes, it shortens the curve.