Is it worth upgrading from Nikon F80 to F100?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by ted_smith, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. ted_smith

    ted_smith Member

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    I have a Nikon F80. I am thinking of upgrading it to a second-hand better model (all my kit I buy is second hand mostly). But I'm not sure what benefits the F100 brings over the F80? My price range (that I am willing to spend) is about £200 ($400). The F100 seems to retail for around that price from new now, so can anyone recommend a better model that I might pick up second hand for that price? If so, what advantages does it have over the F80?

    Any advice appreciated

    Ted
     
  2. Ray Heath

    Ray Heath Member

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    hi Ted

    if you don't know, and your current camera does all you want, why sweat it?

    Ray
     
  3. Bill R

    Bill R Member

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    The F100 offers moisture and dust resistant seals, a slightly better AF system and limited compatibility with non AF lenses. You can also use the custom settings to allow aperture changes via the aperture ring on the lens rather than the on-camera dials. The F100 is also slightly larger and heavier and lacks the pop-up flash. For outdoor fill flash, it's nice to have that little pop up rather than carrying a full SB-XXX.
    Why not though--F100s are going cheap and they're a hell of a camera. Buy it, keep the 80, compare and chalk it up to research. When it comes down to it, can you really afford not to try one?
     
  4. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Ted. I had also considerd the F100 for a while and still look but I have never seen one in mint condition which is like new for as little as £200. What sources have you found where F100 is £200? For body alone I'd have thought "mint" to be about £300-350. The next F series upwards is the F5 but a mint one is likely to be nearer £450-500. If you do a search you'll find thread(s) on F100 v F5.

    E-bay may return slightly lower prices than I have quoted but certainly Gray's in London, Ffordes or Mifsud's will not or will not quote £200 for mint(as new).


    If you've found a F100 for £200 and you're sure it's mint then go for it.

    pentaxuser
     
  5. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

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    Yes, the F100 is a wonderful camera. I own three. The only camera worth switching to from the F100 is the F6, but I don't have the bucks.
     
  6. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    "s it worth upgrading from Nikon F80 to F100?"

    YES
     
  7. film_guy

    film_guy Member

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    If you have the cash lying around not doing anything, why not go for it? From what I heard about the F100, it's the equivalent of Canon's EOS 3. I upgraded from an Elan 7N (equivalent of F80) to the 3, and it was worth every penny.

    There's no real need to buy any analog gear new nowadays, unless you really like the new gear smell/feel. There's tonnes of lightly-used analog film gear out there, and you can use the savings for things like film, accessories, etc.
     
  8. Ray Heath

    Ray Heath Member

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    or you could use that lying around cash to buy more film for the camera you are already familiar with
     
  9. 23mjm

    23mjm Member

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    YES YES YES---Well here is my 3 cents worth

    I use the F100 to shot Cycling and Rock Climbing and I like the faster shooting rate 4.5fps normally and 5+fps with the MB-15. The MB-15 grip make the camera a little bigger and if fits my hand better. I also like the fact that it will meter with AI and AIS lenses, on of my favorites is the 24mm f/2.8 and a Russian 16mm F/2.8

    Oh yea if you get one I have a PDF of the manual I can email you
     
  10. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I have an N-75 and asked the same questions a few month ago. the answer is "yes". I brought the F-100 and use both. I have UC 400 in the N-75 and Tri-X in the F-100. I use the spot meter of the F-100 to check for the darkest and lightest exposures to get the most out of Tri-X. Sometimes I do the same and use the exposure for the UC 400.

    The F-100 gives me more flexibility on the overrides than the N-75 does. Both will work as a point and shoot if I am in a hurry.

    Steve
     
  11. declark

    declark Subscriber

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    I just went thru the exact same mental torture and finally sprung for an exc cond F100 from KEH and it's indeed in excellent condition. Definitely more heft and a bit bigger than the N80, but feels great. The AF seems a lot more robust than the N80 especially in low light driving a "slow" Tamron 24-135 f3.5-5.6 screwdriver lens. I am probably going to miss the pop up light the most, but maybe the 1/250 flash sync will make up for it. I ran my first roll thru last weekend and I only lost a couple shots to an itchy trigger finger (seems the shutter release might be a bit more sensitive than my N80). I took shots mostly inside and some outside with an SB-28 and all seemed very well exposed and sharply focused. Most of the indoor shots were at my daughter's waterpolo banquet and to keep up with high schoolers the AF has to be fast. I was able to get some shots that I know my N80 would have hunted on and lost. Now to find the smallest flash I can stuff in a pocket, I like the looks of the SB-400, but I don't think it is compatible.
     
  12. Bill R

    Bill R Member

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    That's a good question. Does anyone know if the SB400 is compatible?
     
  13. lns

    lns Member

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    I think that flash is only compatible with digital cameras, so I'd say no.

    -Laura
     
  14. 23mjm

    23mjm Member

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    NO the SB400 and F100 don't mix I have them and was bummed.
     
  15. Marc Akemann

    Marc Akemann Subscriber

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    Ted,

    Years ago, when all I had was a simple Nikon EM, and I would run into a few extra dollars to spend, my first thought was "...glass, glass, glass!" What lens could I get? Is there a lens you'd like to have over an F100? If not, the F100 is a nice and worthwhile step up.

    Marc
     
  16. ted_smith

    ted_smith Member

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    Thanks all. Very useful replies. A few points to note :

    1) I have a Nikon SB-800 flash gun which, as far as I know, will work with the F100
    2) I don't have the cash lying around as such, more's the pitty. I'm just always looking to better my kit where I can and was wondering whether it was 'worth' upgrading from the F80 to F100.
    3) Glass wise : FilmSprocket - I am with you 100% there. All my major investments have been in glass. My Nikon 80-200 2.8 was my most 'serious' expenditure in that regard. But I have the Macro 60mm prime (from new), Standard 50mm (from new) and the SuperWide 20mm too - all of which seem like great lenses so far.
    4) Price wise - I think the prices I quoted where from e-Bay. Not sure now though because having just done a search again they do all seem to be >£200

    I will give it some more thought and have a ponder, as well as reading a side-by-side comparison.
     
  17. Marc Akemann

    Marc Akemann Subscriber

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    Ted you've got some really nice lenses there, so, getting the F100 makes sense if you can swing it.

    The F100 is much better built than the N80.
    The F100 can meter with mf AI & AIS lenses (N80 doesn't). This may more important for me than for you, I don't know.
    The F100 auto-focuses faster.
    The F100 flash synch is 1/250 while the N80's is 1/125 of a second.
    The F100 uses the more common AA batteries.
    The F100 viewfinder shows 96% while the N80 shows only 92% of a scene.
    The F100 does exposure compensation by thirds of a stop rather than the N80's 1/2 stop increments. (Third stop increments are my choice, may not be an issue for you, though.)
    And lastly, the F100 weighs a little more but I relate that with added quality in this case.

    I associate the F100 closely to the F5. I do not associate the N80 with the F5. So, with the lenses you already have, you'd have a really great set-up if you added an F100 to your equipment list.

    I hope that helps!

    Marc

     
  18. kram

    kram Member

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    the F100 can take IR film (not muchof that around now) 'cos it has a metal back. If the F80 has a plastic back that is another reason.
     
  19. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    The back isn't the issue (the F601 has a plastic back and I shot IR film in it without any problems at all). The issue is the infrared-based film transport system that the F80 has. The F100's system uses sprockets.
     
  20. kram

    kram Member

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    Cheers Jim, at the back of my mind I knew about the counting system in the F80, but I was under the false assumption (as it turns out) the the plastic back was the main reason for IR not being suitable for the F80 - I stand corrected.
     
  21. snegron

    snegron Member

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    The F100 has a plastic back. This is the weak spot (IMHO) on the F100. Everything else is made of metal except for the plastic back.

    As far as upgrading goes, I believe that it is a matter of personal preference and intended use. The F80 (or N80 as it is known here in the U.S.A.) is a very reliable camera and has the advantage of being one of Nikon's lightest SLR's. If you plan on shooting all day, lighter weight might make a difference. The F100 is heavier, larger, and has much better weather sealing and AF functions.

    I have both and I think I have used the N80 more, mostly because of the light weight. Funny thing I just realized is that I think I have only shot about 5 rolls of film with my F100 after buying it new a little over a year ago. It is a great camera, but for some reason it feels too much like a pro DSLR. I enjoy using my old Nikon F with FTN finder much more. :smile:
     
  22. praktica

    praktica Member

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    No, it sounds like a vanity purchase. If you are a pro and you need a rugged camera then yes but otherwise save your money for the sake of having a posey pro camera that will be too big and heavy to be worth taking anywhere.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 9, 2008
  23. Marc Akemann

    Marc Akemann Subscriber

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    A little 28 ounce 35mm camera is "...too big and heavy to be worth taking anywhere."? If one's health is reasonably good and he or she has at least an adequate amount of desire to take pictures, a 28 oz. camera should be able to be handled fairly easily, I would think.