Is this washer archival??

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Bighead, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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  2. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Archival Print Washer

    Thats what its designed for. Of course, you have to leave prints in the wash long enough, as you would any archival washer. The drain is on the bottom and the drum is designed to rotate for hours on end, all day.
     
  3. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    So there is a constant flow of fresh water??
     
  4. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    Hi Bighead

    I used this washer at college, it is archival if you alone are washing prints and you are sure it drains from the bottom as fresh is added, at school there always was the person who would print late and add their prints to the mix and piss everyone off.
    As well the constant rotation may ding some corners but if it was closer to me I would pick it up. go for it.
     
  5. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    "Archival" washing is controlled by the diffusion rate - it doesn't matter if the water is running or not as long as the thiosulfate concentration in the water is lower than in the emulsion.

    In other words: Time is more important than movement.

    Incidentally it has been found that paper with a (very) small remaining thiosulfate content is more archival than when all the thiosulfate has been washed out.
     
  6. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    test to be sure

    Being archival is a technique that includes all of the prior steps as well as washing. To be sure one should test both fixing as well as washing. This, I feel, is true regardless of the techniques or washer being employed.

    If you have the time and energy and are willing to shuffle prints and change water by dumping and refilling at appropriate intervals, the use of a single tray can provide the best possible wash. Conversely. the finest print washer can give terrible results as far a thoroughness when poorly used..
     
  7. fotch

    fotch Member

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    constant


    [font=&quot]Yes. There are valves to control the flow rate. Drains from the bottom. Motor can run all day. I don't know how many prints it can do but would guess more that one person could put out. Plenty of room in the drum which must be 21 inches across and 18 inches in diameter.

    I would guess that at the end of the day, you would shut both valves rather than refill everyday.

    IMHO, itÂ’s an impressive print washer.[/font]
     
  8. msage

    msage Member

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    I have used this type of washer a lot in the old days. It uses a lot of water and often the prints stick together. Also, prints occasionlly would have damaged coners.

    Michael
     
  9. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    This seems to be similar to the huge print washer in my school, different design but made for lots of washing... I hypoclear all prints, constant agitation for 5 minutes, to reduce wash time to 20 minutes, as opposed to an hour (for fiber)....

    Damage is possible in the school washer as well. I dodge other students washes, in order to do a wash of my own (and maybe my girlfriends, if I'm feeling generous)

    Thank you everyone for you input....
     
  10. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    A single tray? Though I do process single tray, where more than
    one print is involved I think two trays make for a more efficient use
    of time. I use hydrophobic seperator sheets; one at bottom and top
    of stack, and one twixt each print. Once placed the prints are not
    disturbed untill moved to the second tray. They see the first tray
    one more time then are done; three washes.

    I preceed the wash with a fix of A. Thiosulfate concentrate
    diluted 1:49. A rinse, a hca, a rinse, ALL one-shot, follow. The still
    water diffusion method of washing is, I believe, the most sure way
    to a uniformly archival washed print; no bubbles no eddies. Also,
    the Still Water Diffusion way of washing needs no plumbing,
    costs nothing, and uses very little water. Dan
     
  11. chuck94022

    chuck94022 Subscriber

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    Let's see - it appears to be stainless steel, so it probably won't rust. I'd say if you don't leave it out in the rain, it ought to last 200-300 years, or at least as long as the prints you wash inside it... :D

    -chuck
     
  12. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    This additional information should have been included above.
    For an 8 x 10 print 5ml of 60% concentrate in 245ml of water
    are suggested. Also, I've all solutions at room temperature. Dan
     
  13. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    The washer is archival. It`s forty years old and still going strong.

    It makes archival prints on FB paper pretty well too. My wedding photographer friend was showing me some work finished in the 1960`s with that washer. They still look as new.