Issues regarding contact printing 12x20

Discussion in 'Contact Printing' started by reggie, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. reggie

    reggie Member

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    Hi:

    I am getting ready to order a 12x20 frame from Doug Kennedy, but is this the right way to go? Should I be getting a vaccum frame for a negative this large?

    If so, any suggestions on what vaccum frame to get? Occasionaly old beat-up looking ones come up on eBay, but I don't often seen anything very attractive looking. Please don't tell me to make one. I can't make soup.

    Thanks.

    -Mike

    P.S. I could also use a good idea for negative storage. I am looking at 16x20 polypropelene sleeves and nice strong film boxes from Light Impressions right now.
     
  2. Peter De Smidt

    Peter De Smidt Member

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    The vacuum frame will be quicker to use. I bought a big one off ebay for very little and drove an hour to pick it up. I wouldn't want one of these shipped. It's a Nuarc, and it's well-built. Get one just big enough for your purpose. Mine is huge, at least 20x 30", which makes it harder to store.
     
  3. Michael Kadillak

    Michael Kadillak Member

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    By all means get a vacuum frame with a pump. Spring back frames work OK, but getting a strong vacuum to pull the negative and the paper together is a marriage made in heaven. It simply does not get any better OR any easier and that is a hard combination to beat. Be patient and start looking. May take you a little while, but it will be well worth it.

    Cheers!
     
  4. WarEaglemtn

    WarEaglemtn Member

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    Go with the vacuum frame and you will get flattening that is needed for the larger paper. In times of high humidity it is difficult to get the large paper completely flat in contact printing. If you decide to do pt/pd or other hand coated emulsions it is difficult to get the paper/neg sandwich completely flat with a spring back frame. The vacuum frame is much more reliable in this respect.
     
  5. Steve Sherman

    Steve Sherman Subscriber

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    Vacuum frame

    Vacuum frame all the way.

    I used to use an older 16x20 contact frame and when I switched to Semi-Stand film development of larger negatives there appeared to be random pockets of softer sharpness. Purchased a vacuum frame on eBay and problem was solved. THis was with single weight Azo, so if you are going to coat your own paper the vacuum frame is the only way to go.
     
  6. reggie

    reggie Member

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    Thanks everyone. I'll keep my eyes open on eBay for one.

    -R