Jobo drum recommendations...more specifically.

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by ZoneIII, Mar 23, 2008.

  1. ZoneIII

    ZoneIII Member

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    I asked a similar question before but it was correcly pointed out by someone who responded to it that I wasn't specific enough in my wording so I am re-wording my question and asking it again.

    Like many of you, I no longer have a reasonably close E6 lab anymore so I am going to start processing my own E6 film again. I will be using a Jobo processor. The vast majority of my work is shot in 4x5" and 8x10" but I occasionally shoot 35mm and medium format as well. I already have Expert drums for my sheet film. My question pertains only to roll film formats. So..... What drums would you recommend for E6 processing of roll film when using a Jobo processor? My highest priority is the quality of the developed film. Ease of agitation is not an issue because I will be using a Jobo processor. Cost of the drums, waste of chemicals, etc., are not important issues. In other words, I am looking for recommendations for drums that will produce the most evenly developed roll film possible when used in a Jobo processor. I will be processing both single rolls and multiple rolls.

    I will not be processing b&w with the Jobo processor. Yes! I know how many people rave about it being used for that purpose but I have been processing b&w sheet film in trays for decades and I have absolutely no problems with that at all. I can't even remember having a scratched negative and my film develops with beautiful evenness and my densitometers confirms that. When I have very large amounts of sheet film - after a long trip, for example - I use a line-sink and I have never had any of the problems that other's report when processing that way. Anyway, I mentioned this only to make it clear that my question only pertains to E6 processing of 35mm and medium format film in a Jobo processor when quality is the primary goal.

    Thanks
     
  2. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

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    I think any of the 2500 series drums with 2500 series reels would be good.

    The older 1500 series are not as nice.

    I have never consistently mastered winding two rolls of 120 film per reel. There is a little plastic detente that divides the rolls and prevents over-winding the second roll. I don't do high volume so I just wind one roll per reel.

    Also be aware that the large tanks with many reels, two 120 rolls per reel and the larger amount of solution required to cover the internal roll is quite heavy and might wear on the motor.
     
  3. Gadfly_71

    Gadfly_71 Subscriber

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    I prefer the 1500 series drums with roll films. The tanks require much less chemistry and the capacities for roll film are about the same as the 2500 series. Plus the reels cost less. The only benefit I see to using 2500 series tanks is the 2509 sheet film reels, which you don't seem to need.

    If you're already using expert drums I wouldn't worry about drag on the motor with large tanks. The expert drums put much more drag on the motor than a 1500 series tank with 8 rolls of 35mm.

    Regards,
    Andrew
     
  4. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

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    I've always used the 2500 series tanks and they work very well. I have no experience with the 1500 series. Doing E6 and C41 the film comes out evenly developed, and I've never had a problem. I imagine the 1500 series tanks could be just as good.