Just processed my first blank roll of film - ugh

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Sean, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    Well I had high hopes for this roll. This is from the shoot with John and Robert last weekend. It would have probably had 3 of my best negs, and it was shot with my 645. The roll came out blank so I am almost 100% sure I must have loaded the film backwards and exposed nothing but blackout paper? It was the first time I ever used 120roll (previously used polaroid 665 negs). I guess I'll grab a few expired films from the shop and practice loading again and shoot a quick test roll. The camera seems fine, shutter is firing properly, etc. sigh.. :sad:
     
  2. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Sean,

    Welcome to the club, your no longer a virgin!!! :smile:

    We have all been there done that one, probably more than once....

    Practice, and practice again, and don't be real surprised if it happens again...

    Welcome to the club...

    Dave
     
  3. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    You don't think maybe it was mad at you for trying to sell it?

    The film does go around kind of funny, but I am not sure how one would misload it. I might waste a roll just to see if it is possible. What a bummer. Somehow I have managed to avoid this particular problem, but with the 50 or so sheets of 4X5 I shot before I got one evenly developed sheet, I can feel your pain.
     
  4. Lee L

    Lee L Member

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    Hopefully this will make you feel better, at least by comparison. I freelanced very often at two adjacent studios 20+ years ago. I was already booked at one, so the other hired a new assistant in town who had graduated from RIT in Rochester, NY. He assured them he knew how to load the MF film backs, and he set up a number of backs for a shoot for a large department store chain. The photographer went through three different shots before he convinced himself that there was something really wrong with the way the film had been loaded and opened a back to find that he'd been shooting on the backing paper of 120 film. He had to reshoot the group he had on set, and had to call back 10 models for the other two shots he'd finished at his expense, about $70 to $100 an hour for each model.

    I know you lost shots you really wanted, but at least it's not costing you a lot of money.

    The first studio I worked in tested my 4x5 loading before hiring me. I had to clean and load a dozen 4x5 holders and the photographer then checked the film orientation in every one before he would hire me. That was after I assured him that I could load film properly. When we shot his Hasselblads for the first time, I told him I'd not loaded one before, so I did some practice rolls until we were both satisfied.

    The worst thing I did (for the same studio with the reversed film problem) was lose a roll of exposed 120 shooting on location in a very crowded knick-knack / novelty shop. We searched high and low and never found it.

    Lee
     
  5. narsuitus

    narsuitus Member

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    Sorry for your loss. However, be thankful that it was not worse. You could have lost a roll of color film that you took the time and effort to mix the chemicals and hand process yourself.
     
  6. photomc

    photomc Member

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    Yup!! Done that one, more than once...first time was when shooting some stuff for someone (had a backup 35mm of all the 120's) right after I got the camera. 2nd time was after I had not used it in a while and sure enough. It seems like it should be hard to do, but somehow it isn't. All I know is, when I take the film insert out of the camera when a roll is finished, if I see the color of the paper (Ilford=white, Kodak=yellow,etc) then I know life is good, if all I see is black...as in the back of the backing paper, well then I know I better have some backup or plan to re-shoot.

    Sorry Sean....I know it stinks, but bet you don't ever do it again....or maybe once more.
     
  7. Les McLean

    Les McLean Subscriber

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    Wait till you get the hang of loading the film and go out and get the shot of a lifetime with the most magnificent light you can imagine. Rush home and load the tank, prepare the chemicals paying special attention to the temperature for you want this roll to be perfectly developed. Put the first solution into the tank and before you stop pouring you know that you've put the fixer in first. Been there done that !*^0£"3

    Welcome to the club Sean
     
  8. Dinesh

    Dinesh Subscriber

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    I went out the other evening and took what I thought were some potentially decent shots, only to find out when I got home that I hadn't loaded any film into my A12 magazine. Is it possible for a person to regress in intelligence?
     
  9. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

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    Luckily, I haven`t had made such mistakes as that yet apart from under/overdeveloping and stupid exposure errors at the taking stage (I think we have probably all done that at one time or another).
    I would have been gutted if I had blank negatives, which is one of the reasons why I dread being asked to photograph Weddings which of course can not be repeated if mistakes are made. Wedding photography is a stressful career in my opinion. Blank negs and you get sued.
     
  10. RAP

    RAP Member

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    Oh sure, have I ever done that? No one has to know and I'll never tell. :rolleyes:
     
  11. lee

    lee Member

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    I processed a roll of 120 film for Les McLean at my darkroom and it came out totally blank. After a day or two of research we discovered that we had only used Part b of a two part developer. We did not have any part A to use. That was pretty shocking too.

    lee\c
     
  12. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Argh! the same thing almost happened to me when I used rexp Koni the 1st time....
    Somehow insctinct kicked in and saw that the wrong sside of the paper backing was going to get exposed :wink:

    PS. are you sure you didn't dunk the film in the fix first?


     
  13. zenrhino

    zenrhino Member

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    Do you have any idea how good it is to hear that from a pro? :D

    Sometimes I wonder if I'm the only one making bonehead mistakes.
     
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  15. bobbysandstrom

    bobbysandstrom Member

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    OK. Talk about frustration... I was testing my film(4x5) with my jobo when I first got into large format photography. Setup the exposure tests, metered and took the shots, mixed the chemicals, tempered the chemicals, loaded the drum, processed only to pull out the thinnest negs I've ever seen. This happened time after time. I tried switching lenses, still the same. I put a medium format back on and everything was fine. Tried again with 4x5 film and back to square 1. I went through alomost 90 sheets of film before I discovered by freak accident I was loading the film backwards!!!!!! Put the cutout in the upper right corner the instructions read. Well I was. The upper right corner as you load is the lower right corner when the holder stands vertical! Hence, backward loading. Welcome to the club Sean.
     
  16. Soeren

    Soeren Member

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    I don't get this thread. Whats the point in processing blank films ?
    And whats the fun in dropping the film on the floor when rolling it on the reels?
    And why expose the backingpaper ?
    And the fix don't go in first, guys !

    Why do you do that ?
    I have never done any of the above, never. Well that is ..... ahem
    Darned Im a lousy lier. :D :D :D

    Well as said, it's comforting to know the pros does it as well
    Cheers Søren
     
  17. haris

    haris Guest

    Once, I put paper in developer, stop, fixer, go to washing, nothing on paper. Go to enlarger again, repeat all again, nothing. Atleast 10 times repeated all over again. Mixed new developer, repeated all again atleast 5 times more, nothing. And then, I discovered I tooked bottle filled with clean water to stay a little for washing it insted of bottle with fixer...

    Boy, I am glad to be member of your goup folks :smile:
     
  18. Nige

    Nige Subscriber

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    Sean, just print it anyway and say it's from a dark period of your photographic life :smile:

    The 1st roll I put thru my M645 came out blank. I'd just got the camera that day from an online auction site. Luckily I was online and my 'net photo buddies of the time suggested I'd loaded the film inside out and so I tried another and 15mins later at least knew the camera worked!
     
  19. Thomassauerwein

    Thomassauerwein Member

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    When I was in school Someone hired me to shoot their wedding. I was referred by the instructer as being the most qualified. We had just bought a Hassy system so I thought I'd use that instead of 35mm. The whole day loaded the film backwards. Needless to say they did not pay.
     
  20. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Just to be fair everyone, I had a hand in helping Sean load his camera. Sorry Sean, it was a sweet day for shooting B&W.
     
  21. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    Thanks guys (and no worries Robert, looks like these things happen a lot!) :smile:

    Well, I am sure I did not put the fixer in first, I have a habit of doing a quick smell test before pouring. I think the next few times I load a roll I might just pop on my night vision goggle and have a quick peek at it to ensure that yes, there's the film. I should be able to reshoot atleast 2 of the 3 shots so will have to head back up and try again. Might even do some polaroid negs as backup just to be extra sure everything is working well. Eventhough it was a loss I still had fun shooting with John and Robert and got some training on the eyes..
     
  22. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Sean:

    There is another possibility. If I recall correctly, you use a Mamiya M645 Super. Is there any chance that you left the dark slide in place?

    I know there is an interlock which is supposed to prevent you from releasing the shutter or winding the film if the dark slide is in place, but I have one Mamiya 645 insert that is defective - you can load film on to it, and advance the film through the camera with it, but something is wrong with the gearing or the connection, and as a result, the dark slide interlock doesn't do its job. It lets me merrily shoot a whole roll, and the only clue is that the advance is a bit noisier than usual.

    I have other 120 and 220 inserts, and they work fine in that back. If I switch the problem insert to another back, the new back exhibits the same problem. I haven't tried the problem insert on all three of my camera bodies (I probably should) but its pretty clear that the insert is the problem.

    I would check the insert, and the dark slide.

    Hope this helps,

    Matt
     
  23. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    You gotta stop using Damitol developer. Pre-packaged or home-mixed, the stuff just doesn't work.
     
  24. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    I prefer the newer, more advanced, Damitol 2L. Seems to do the trick when nothing else will. (When nothing else will make my results totally suck, that is)
     
  25. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    Hi Matt, I'm pretty conscious of the dark slide and my back will not let the shutter fire with it in place.

    Damitol developer- lol
     
  26. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    What Sean didn't mention was that he shot the entire roll trying to take some pictures for the "darkroom portraits" thread showing what his darkroom looks like with all the lights off . It actually came out perfect :smile:

    BTW, Sean. Did the frame numbers develop on that roll?