Kaiser Film Loader Numbering Problem

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by zouwee, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. zouwee

    zouwee Member

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    Hello All,
    I have had my kaiser film loader for a while now and have yet to figure out how to get the numbering on my rolls to come out right. I have read the instructions a hundred times (i can read german) and they seem clear to me. Yet the numbering always starts on a different and random number; never at 1.
    I have attached the instructions I have so you can reference what I'm using.
    I have watched all the videos I can find on this but I can't see what I'm doing wrong.
    Here's the procedure I'm following (staring with the bulk film already in the loader):

    1. Check the iso indicator (There is a red dot and a white dot. I'm aligning my iso to the white dot.).
    2. Pull down the reset lever (No. 9 on the diagram) to bring the "Film Meter" to the "S" position. I do this before each roll. Maybe I shouldn't?
    3. Line up the two white triangles on the exposure counter (No. 11 on the diagram).
    4. Remove the Crank and open the cover.
    5. Turn the film transport knob (No.5 on the diagram) to bring some film out.
    6. Tape the film to the spool and close the cartridge.
    7. Turn the Transporter knob back to retract the film and bring the cartridge into the compartment.
    8. Close lid. Insert Crank. Turn crank until I get to 36.
    9. Remove crank. Open lid. Turn Transporter. Cut film.

    What am I doing wrong?
    I have tried many variations but to no avail.
    Should I NOT pull the reset lever each time? I have noticed that after I have aligned the triangles and then turn the transporter to bring film out, the counter moves and the triangles go out of alignment. Should I put them back?
    Sometimes when taping the film to the spool I pull the film further out of the loader. Could this be causing the problem?
    Thanks in advance for any help!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. dmb

    dmb Member

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    The film loader cannot read the as yet undeveloped edge markings so there is no way for it to know where the numbering starts. Setting the ISO is just a reminder for yourself of what speed the film is that you have in the loader and usually people use the red and white dots to indicate B&W or colour film. The reset button is simply there so that you know how many frames you have wound into the cassette, so you should reset it each time you load. Everyone who bulk loads film has to live with random start numbers on their negs.
     
  3. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    You would have to determine what the first number on the roll of film by cutting off a piece and developing it.

    You would have to determine how much film your camera wastes at the beginning and end of each roll.

    You would have to figure out if an offset is needed and account for that in your process.

    Then, once you have determined all that, you would have to do everything the exact same way every time. If your count goes off by more than a little bit, your system will be screwed and you'll have to start all over again.

    Too much of a PITA.

    Just label and date each roll of film you develop and store them in an orderly fashion.

    For example, refer to a given frame of film as <DATE> <ROLL> <FRAME>: Dec. 7, 2012 -- Roll 3 -- Frame 15(A)

    Shorthand: 2012/12/07 R3 F15(A)

    Done this way (or in a similar way) every single image you make has a unigue identifer that you can always keep track of.

    The frame numbers printed on the border of the film are just nominal.
     
  4. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    Once upon a time (mid 70's I seem to recall) Kodak actually sold a bulk load film with the narrowed leader, and a a notch of where to cut the film.

    Edge numbering is just a convenient reference. Some Freestyle Arista films do not have them, and I do just fine. On a bunch of my cut down films I use for varied projects with obsolete film format cameras,I never expect edge markings.

    All my films get into neg filing sheets, and in the case of no edge marking they get referred to as row x , frame y, where y is somewhere between 1 and 5 usually.
     
  5. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    All the advice above is correct, but I have one further bit of advice to add as well.

    This is a perfect example of something that is best to ask advice about before you get frustrated.

    We are here to help!
     
  6. zouwee

    zouwee Member

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    C'est La Vie!
    I'm actually kind of relieved. I thought I must be an idiot... and maybe I am for not asking sooner.
    Thanks for all the input and tips. It's much appreciated.