Keeping equipment dry in snow storms and rain -

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by mporter012, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. mporter012

    mporter012 Member

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    Hello!

    Recently, I have been shooting primarily in increment weather conditions (rain, snow, wind). I am using a Nikon FE2 body with 28mm and 50mm lenses, with the hope of adding a hasselblad system in the near future. My question is this: How wet can I let my equipment get before it becomes a problem? When shooting in snow storms, things inevitably get wet eventually and sometimes the light meter stops working (maybe from the cold?). I am using an umbrella to help protect things, but that only works so well. I'm concerned I am going to damage something. Are there any weather protection covers that are worth buying?

    Thanks!

    Mark
     
  2. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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  3. anikin

    anikin Subscriber

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  4. dwross

    dwross Member

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    A subject near and dear to my heart! Wild weather is the rule here. For wet, you just can't beat plastic bags. You can't buy anything, no matter the cost, that works better. The bigger the bag, the better. I have a collection. Bed, Bath, and Beyond uses humongous bags -- to name one. The bags dry cleaning comes in are good, if you're careful with them.

    What you need to do is this: In the middle of the bottom of the bag, cut the smallest opening that fits a filter for your lens, and then tape the cut edges of the bag all the way around the filter. When the filter comes off and on, the bag comes with it. You do all your work with the camera inside the bag. Only the filter gets wet. You can also tape the bag to a metal lens hood/shade and then just make sure you don't point your camera into the rain.

    I don't use a camera that needs a battery when it's really cold. When I'm shooting in the snow, I keep my exposure meter in a pocket on the inside of my coat. Body heat keeps it working fine.

    d
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2012
  5. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    Large ziploc bags and a lens shade. Close the bag around the lens shade as mentioned by Denise. Have a dry towel just in case. A water-proof camera bag or backpack is helpful as well. The North Face should have water-proof duffel bags. Not much concern for snow down here but a light misty rain is one of my favorite conditions.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/