Kids in the bath!

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by SuzanneR, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    All,

    I've been trying to make some bath time photographs of my kids, and find that the light in the bathroom is quite flat. I've used HP5, but my exposures are so long that they become movement abstracts, and I haven't come up with one that I like. I've also tried D3200, and there is some potential there, but the images so far are a bit grainy.

    I'm not sure I can solve this with exposure/development alone, and maybe I should try a flash. Any strategies for how to go about shooting in a small interior room with flat light? I want to try to avoid harsh shadows on the wall/tub behind them.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. mark

    mark Member

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    I don't take bath time pictures. I find diaper on the head pictures much more usable for future blackmail:smile:

    An off camera flash through diffuser at the bathing individual.
     
  3. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    3 suggestions

    1). Assuming your flash has sufficient power point it into the junction of 2 walls with the ceiling at the farthest corner. This I believe will allow the shadow to fall quite low and perhaps mainly out of your frame. This may result in heavy shadows under the eyes...I have a hard time telling from here. If the walls are light colored you may get a nice natural fill. 2). Point the flash at the wall directly opposite the children and about a foot higher than their heads if the first choice is not suitable. You will definitely get shadows. 3). Use the flash directly over the camera lens and about a foot higher. This type of lighting is fairly flat. You might prefer it for color. All you will get is a small shadow under their chins.

    If you do not have flash metering capability then shoot a roll keeping notes of all three methods and examine the negatives that you develop.

    For myself, having used flash for decades I prefer manual rather than automatic flash. If you use manual just remeber that if you double or halve the distance you have changed your exposures by 2 F stops.

    Make certain that your flash is place where it can not fall into the water. It is my understanding that the capacitors, even in a small unit, are capable of carrying a DEADLY shock.
     
  4. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Part of the reason I haven't tried the flash here is the inherent dnager of extra lights near the bath tub!

    Thanks for the tips, I've done that "into the corner of the walls cieling" trick, and it's quite effective. I'll experiment with it this week!