"King Size" 126 film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by msage, Jan 14, 2008.

  1. msage

    msage Member

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    Hi
    I have a roll of "King Size" 126 color print film. It looks to be 20-30 years old, but no indication of which process (C-22 or C-41). Called Film Rescue, they can process but can't tell what process it is. Any ideas?
    Michael
     
  2. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    20 years old c-41, 30, c-41, any date? There maybe a date on the paper backing. Has the film been exposed?
     
  3. msage

    msage Member

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    Hi Paul
    The film has been advanced so is most likely exposed. I am hesitant to open the cassette as it is not my film. I will get the ok to check the paper backing for any info. Thanks
    Michael
     
  4. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    It would have to be at least 35 years old to be C-22. It is most likely C41 film.

    There was a chain of photo labs in Canada called King Size Photo at the time. I can't recall if they had their own film or not. Of course, if your film is of quasi-American origin there may have been a separate shop or chain on your side of the 49th parallel.
     
  5. msage

    msage Member

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    It was sold through King Size Photo of Everett, Wa. A little south of the 49th parallel. :smile:
    Michael
     
  6. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    Everett isn't exactly far from Canada, so maybe it was the same chain.
     
  7. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    The big 126 film was discontinued before the Instamatic size came into being. That would be over 40 years ago, and the film would be C-22 or even an earlier process. There was a rapidly changing series of Kodacolors at that time. The very early stuff was just called Kodacolor and had a box with red, green, and blue narrow stripes on it near the size marking. Kodacolor-X was the last of the C-22 films, as I remember.
     
  8. msage

    msage Member

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    126 was around well into the 1990's at least, which would make it C-41. I believe that the Instamatic camera came two sizes, 110 and 126. I am sure that 126 size was C-22 and later, C-41. Both were plastic cartage films.
    Michael
     
  9. BobbyR

    BobbyR Member

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    126 was roll film; 127 was instamatic.

    The only 127 did was E4 but it may have changed to later formats.
     
  10. msage

    msage Member

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    Sorry you have that backwards.:smile: 126 is Instamatic and 127 is roll. As I post this I am looking at both.
    Michael
     
  11. erikg

    erikg Member

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    No, 126 is instamatic and 127 is the large roll film. Maybe you could do a snip test? Probably a lot of fog on the roll.
     
  12. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    126 has a paper backing, so it is a roll film in a plastic cassette. 127 E 4, I am not sure about E 6 were called super slides. I vaguely recall that 127 super slides fit in a standard projector, or is my memory fading.
     
  13. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    As per Wiki:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_format
     
  14. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    Check: http://www.nwmangum.com/Kodak/FilmHist.html

    The original 126 film was introduced in 1900 and discontinued by Kodak in 1949, It produced 4-1/4 by 6-1/2 negatives. I'm not sure if Kodacolor was ever made in that size, but if it was it would use the very oldest Kodacolor process (pre-C22). The other 126 film was for the original Instamatic. This was 35mm film with a paper backing and special perforation housed in a plastic cassette. Both C22 and C41 Kodacolor were made in that size. If you have Kodacolor-X, it's C22; otherwise, it is most likely C41. 127 film was 46 mm wide roll film made for a variety of cameras over a very long time. I think Kodak discontinued it in the 1980s, but some European suppliers still make it.
     
  15. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    126 Instamatic size film can be processed on standard 35mm reels, as the film is the same width as 35mm, but only has one single perforation per square frame. When one would shoot slides on 126 Instamatic, they would be returned in mounts to fit 35mm slide projectors. The image, of course would be square.

    127 roll film, did indeed yield slides known as "Super Slides" and they too would be returned in mounts to fit 35mm slide projectors, but with a much larger square image area.

    110 size "pocket instamatic" film when shot as slides would be returned mounted in small mounts designed to fit a "Pocket" Carousel projector. A much smaller minature projector. I don't think this was ever very popular.
     
  16. ricksplace

    ricksplace Member

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    The 110 slides could be ordered in standard size mounts to run through a standard slide projector. The image, of course, was smaller.
     
  17. BobbyR

    BobbyR Member

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  18. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    My impression is that this is a store-brand film with the store-brand name being "King Size." I don't know who made store-brand films in the pre-C41 era, so if it's from that time I don't know what the candidate processes might be. If it's of more recent vintage it's almost certainly C-41.

    I vaguely recall hearing that it's possible to process C41 film in a B&W developer and then redevelop it in C41 or a modified C41 process to get a color image. If this is true, that might be a good way to go -- develop the film as B&W, print and/or scan the resulting negatives for safety, and then redevelop as C41 if the edge markings give any hope that it's a C41 film.
     
  19. BobbyR

    BobbyR Member

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    Rocky Mountain Film lists these brands of c-22:

    Additional types of C-22 films we can process: Ansco Color, Brilliant film, FK Color, Furicolor, Inter Color, Karanzcolor N21 or N19, 3M Color Print, Negra Color, Oga Color, Prinz Color, Revue, Sakuara, Sears Color, Tura Color, Cornet, Valcolor, Twin Pix, Global CN100, Shell, Ferrania Color Film, @M NM64, Titan, Pal-color, Extra Spool, Milyerson, Nat'l. Hdqrs. Box 7529 Phil.,Pa., Process 22, Paragon, Thrifty Color Neg, Porst Color, Teta Color, Ring Foto, Citcolor, Revue Colour 2000, Trifca MK VI, FCA, Fotop Colour, Color MN19, Directacolor, Picture Pac Color Picture, Montgomery Ward Color Print ASA80, Hanimex Vistacolor ASA100, 22, Ektacolor Type S, Boots Color Print.

    Perhaps they can help you.
    Bobby
     
  20. John Shriver

    John Shriver Member

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    The largest roll film size the original Kodacolor came in was 122 (3A size, 3-1/4" by 5-1/2" exposures). It didn't stay available for long, and was gone long before the anti-trust settlement and the C-22 process. The other common roll sizes made it at least to Kodacolor-II (120, 620, 126 Instamatic, 127, 116, 616, and 828), the first C-41 film. The 110 Pocket Instamatic format started the C-41 process in 1972, the other sizes came out in 1973.