Kodacolor-X (cx 620) exp 1968

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by MenacingTourist, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

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    I bought a $1.99 Ansco ReadyFlash that came with an unopened roll of this film and wondered what I can generally expect from this and if my normal color lab can handle it. Since it's Saturday I can't call the lab so I'm asking you all :smile:

    I loaded it in the camera and will be shooting on sunny days or if I can find some bulbs for the flash. It's been snowing for the past two days so I may have to wait awhile.

    Thanks,

    Alan.
     
  2. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I think Kodacolour-X was C-22 process, but that is based on memory only.
     
  3. greypilgrim

    greypilgrim Member

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    According to Rocky Mountain Film you are right that it is C22. And if RMF still develops it, I would bet that there might be a couple of other labs that do, too.

    Doug
     
  4. Brac

    Brac Member

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    It will be very expensive to process as its the old C22 process. As the film is almost 40 years old the results are likely to be poor with colours off balance and a high base fog level. There could also be mottling & other defects if its been stored in poor conditions - quite a strong possibility with such an old film. Personally I wouldn't bother. I have heard you can process it to a black & white negative but I've got no details.
     
  5. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

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    So basically it has to be processed with C-22 and 75 degrees rather than with C-41 and 100 degrees which would melt off all the emulsion?

    I did some searching and found out about RMF. The $30 to process is a bit steep but I guess it could be interesting and I only have one roll. Too bad I can't put it in my Diana :smile:
     
  6. donbga

    donbga Member

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    Throw the fim away! I can tell you from experience that C-22 process films had a terribly poor shelf life. Save your money.

    Don Bryant
     
  7. battra92

    battra92 Member

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    No no! Save it as a collector's item. If it was exposed, I'd say send it to a guy at Photo.net in the classic cameras forum who can develop c-22 as B&W.