Kodak ‘Investigating What it Would Take’ to Bring Back Kodachrome

Discussion in 'Industry News' started by farmersteve, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. Nzoomed

    Nzoomed Member

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    My question is if Kodachrome was to return, then what would happen with the stockpiles of film in everyones freezers?

    If Kodak move on from K14, then all this film is useless, on the other hand if the new Kodachrome was K14 compatible, then Kodak would have a huge amount of processing to do from everyone's frozen film, (yes there were people that missed dwaynes deadline also)

    But if Kodak want to sell more film, they may decide to change it enough that the old films cant be processed.
     
  2. flavio81

    flavio81 Member

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    This is a good stuff too for them, if they decide to charge for it.
     
  3. Prest_400

    Prest_400 Member

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    The cloud server I've seen it working through 3rd party services or own servers, but with a deadline of X time (a week or so) to retrieve the scans before wiping. Limitations of service or perhaps incurring heavier costs with extended storage. Perhaps could be adjusted to individual customer...
    Yes! Hadn't thought about the pure automatic process and top of mind went for these newer labs that do offer somekind of grading. As Flavio comments, a properly (IT8?) calibrated workflow should give spot on slide scanning. I am wondering if the auto modes on minilab scanners for negative would be the same, bearing in mind the orange mask and such. May be a bit of judgement that auto scanning doesn't always work well.

    (curious to have some fast paced discussion around and realtime adding quotes)
    In the case of an E6 Kodachrome, well, K14 is as it has been for 6 years. More processing? Better to keep the lines moving. Anyways, the same could be thought about frozen E6 film or C41 or B&W. As long as it's not like the guy who spent $10K (or more was it?) to develop a huge batch, it shouldn't saturate operations.
     
  4. 480sparky

    480sparky Member

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    I would continue to shoot and develop it like I have been.... in my darkroom...... as the black & white film it truly is.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    i've only seen "mask" on slide or color negative film i processed in black and white developers
    or had to print through when i enlarged them onto photo paper ... the films i have skrannnnnned 's mask
    has never posed a problem, and i would imagine a mini lab, even one that has been around the block
    with equipment that is not from 2017 would have no trouble electifying the images, seeing i regularly do it
    with a skrannnnnnnnnner from maybe 2006, and before that from the 1990s .. it only posed a problem if i over exposed negative film
    or under exposed e6 film by more than lets say, 3 stops, other than that, no issue,push button technology ...
     
  6. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    You might be right but I wonder what its other source is or sources are for considering a revival of Kodachrome apart from APUG. I have seen some "what might have been" laments for Kodachrome here on APUG that I'd rate alongside Marlon Brando's taxi speech in "On The Waterfront"

    " Kid, it ain't your night. We're taking the price on Ektachrome" :D

    pentaxuser
     
  7. pdeeh

    pdeeh Member

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    There are many other sources for such data, and I'd hope any good market analyst would be able to identify and investigate them.

    Basing one's worldwide product and marketing strategy on the opinions ofcouple of hundred middle aged men with axes to grind wouldn't be that smart, in my opinion.

    But what do I know?
     
  8. wiltw

    wiltw Subscriber

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    Project the 36MPixel digital image with WHAT?...a measly 4K projector that can scarcely match the vertical resolution of a 20D?!
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  9. kb244

    kb244 Member

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    Isn't K14 a really difficult process to do yourself if you can get the chemistry?
     
  10. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member

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    He's processing it as B&W film.
     
  11. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Professional printers are the ones who noticed a lot! It was also photographers buying the "big bickie" prints that also created the most hue and cry with surface imperfections that appeared undetected after printing. Crimping, scuffing, stickiness, wrinkles, separation of base material, contrast irregularities... a very long list! Sometimes entire rolls had these and any manner else of problems and were summarily ripped out and sent back, with weeks and weeks passing before any replacement stock came, and then oftem the same problems were discovered.
     
  12. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    The cry of an APUGger: We don't need no stinkin' quality control! We want our Kodachrome!
     
  13. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Skranning film John? Is that a fit topic for APUG? :D

    But, on a serious note - OMG People, what are you thinking. This ain't gonna happen.

    PE
     
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  15. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    Kodachrome is NEVER coming back. Film is more likely to disappear than Kodak bringing back Kodachrome.
     
  16. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    I know PE....nothing makes this place look more like an insane asylum than the continual re-emergence of Kodachrome threads.
     
  17. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    When Kodachrome comes back I will be forty years younger, forty pound lighter, have a full head of hair and be independently wealthy. I am still incredibly handsome.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  18. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    As I said then, ain't gonna happen.
     
  19. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    you forgot an A its skraaaaaaaaaning
    but it will comeback, i read it on the internets
     
  20. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    But will you have found humility? :whistling:
     
  21. 480sparky

    480sparky Member

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    Yes... even if the chemistry were ever available in the past. I soup it as b&w, which is what Kodachrome really is.
     
  22. wiltw

    wiltw Subscriber

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    There were few centers in the US which would process Kodachrome in its heyday, and eventually it got down to ONE lab (Dwayne's), which eventually closed. The curator of technology at the Kodak museum has said, "Unlike all the other color films, it's actually a black-and-white film. ... The color is added to it in processing. You can't do this at home. It's just not possible. And it was never really a mini-lab process." It was a complicated, expensive, and environmentally challenging K-14 process for Kodachrome which was a big part of the reason the film waned in popularity after the 1980s.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  23. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I am the humblest person I know. I am so humble that sometimes the words that come out of my mouth make me want to use mouthwash to remove the taste of humility.
     
  24. 480sparky

    480sparky Member

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    I found a reference somewhere that one person was able to soup Kodachrome.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K-14_process
     
  25. kb244

    kb244 Member

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    Ahh... So it's like a layered bw film where the colors are 'applied' to the appropriate portion for the effects.

    I had forgotten that it could be processed as a black and white forgoing the color additions.
     
  26. 480sparky

    480sparky Member

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    Steps
    The layers in the film are, top-to-bottom: blue sensitive (yellow), yellow filter, blue-green sensitive (magenta), blue-red sensitive (cyan), acetate base, rem-jet antihalation backing..

    The processing cycle is as follows

    1. Backing removal: An alkaline bath softens the cellulose acetate phthalate binder. A spray wash and buffer removes the rem-jet anti-halation backing.
    2. First Developer: All exposed silver halide crystals are developed to metallic silver via a PQ developer. The yellow filter layer becomes opaque because it has a combination of Lippmann emulsion (very tiny grains) and Carey Lea silver (metallic silver particles that are small enough that they are yellow rather than gray.)
    3. Wash
    4. Red light re-exposure through the base: This makes the remaining undeveloped silver halide in the cyan layers developable.
    5. Cyan developer: The solution contains a color developer and a cyan coupler. These are colorless in solution. After the color developer develops the silver, the oxidized developer reacts with the cyan coupler to form cyan dye. The dye is much less soluble than either the developer or the coupler so it stays in the red layer of the film.
    6. Wash
    7. Blue light re-exposure from the top: This makes the remaining undeveloped grains in the blue sensitive layer (the yellow layer) developable. The now opaque yellow filter layers prevents the blue light from exposing the magenta layer (the green sensitive layer, which is also sensitive to blue light). It is important to avoid stray printing light exposing the film base of film.
    8. Yellow developer: Analogous to the cyan developer.
    9. Wash
    10. Magenta developer: This contains a chemical fogging agent that makes all of the remaining undeveloped silver developable. If everything has worked correctly, nearly all of this silver is in the magenta layers. The developer and magenta coupler work just like the cyan and yellow developers to produce magenta dye that is insoluble and stays in the film.
    11. Wash
    12. Conditioner: Prepares the metallic silver for the bleach step.
    13. Bleach: (Iron EDTA) Oxidises the metallic silver to silver halide. The bleach must be aerated. The former ferricyanide bleach did not require aeration and did not require a conditioner.
    14. Fix: Converts the silver halide to soluble compounds which are then dissolved and washed from the film
    15. Wash: Washes the fixer out of the film.
    16. Rinse: Contains a wetting agent to reduce water spots.
    17. Dry