Kodak 5069 Development

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by htmlguru4242, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    I found a few rolls of Kodak High Contrast Copy (5069) in the freezer. I recall shooting & developing a few rolls of this in the past, but no idea how I developed it ...

    What are people's recommendations for developing this with reasonable contrast?
     
  2. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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  3. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Morning, Htmlguru,

    Kodak's basic recommendation was D-19. That's no longer available, but perhaps the formula is. Kodak's 1971 Professional Data Book, Copying, gives a developing time of 6 minutes with D-19. I also had good luck with Dektol. I can't remember if I used it 1:1 or full strength, nor can I remember the developing times, but they were probably similiar to those for D-19. This film works very well for copying B & W negatives to make projection slides.

    Konical
     
  4. KenS

    KenS Member

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    D19 developer from 'scratch'

    Water @125° F 500 ml.
    Elon 2.2 g.
    Sodium sulphite (des) 96 g.
    Hydroquinone 8.8 g
    Sodium carbonate (des) 48 g.
    Potas. bromide 5 g.
    Cold water to make 1.0 litre

    D19 Replenisher
    Water @ 125° F 500 ml
    Elon 4.4 g
    Hydroquinone 17.6 g
    Sodium Carbonate (des) 48 g
    Sod. hydroxide 7.5 g
    water to make 1.0 litre
    replenish at ~ 25ml per 100 square inches
    but no greater than 'original' D19 volume


    Ken
     
  5. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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    I believe htmlguru4242's original post implied he was looking for pictoral contrast rather than the high contrast D19 will provide. H&W Control was designed to give pictoral contrast--similar approach as with Tech Pan or other document films with ultra-low contrast developers.

    HCC in D19, however, gives very clean high contrast images, if you're looking to copy documents, etc.
     
  6. newcan1

    newcan1 Subscriber

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    There's a simple developer called POTA which I think is metol based and there are several formulae on here. I'm going to try it with some microfilm and it may also be suitable for this high contrast film. I've tried the low contrast Caffenol (Caffenol LC+C?) I was not too impressed - I think I just have a bias against developing film in coffee. It may be worth a try though - it did more or less give me pictorial contrast with the microfilm.
     
  7. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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    POTA is an option, but only has a life of 1 hour after mixing. It is based on phenidone, not metol. The H&W control developer has a longer life as a concentrate, but should be diluted just prior to use, as it has a limited life, also, after dilution. Use the diluted developer only one.

    Basically, any of the pictoral developers for Tech Pan or other document films should would OK with HCC.

    Frugal Photographer has BlueFire HR developer pre-mixed in this category if you don't mix your own.

    Charlie
     
  8. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    I have played with pictorial from high contrast film, to use KodaLith (a whack of which I have stashed) to make low contrast unsharp masks. Pota worked quite well.

    Mixing a dilute low contrast developer it is not a huge challenge. Basically a pinch of sulfite, maybe a gram of metol per litre, and then the rest of the sulfite. Dilute as you feel fit, to cool if fresh, and , with Kodalith I develop by inspection. High contrast copy is also maybe orthochromatic to allow dbi?
     
  9. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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    HCC is panchromatic, if I recall correctly.
     
  10. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

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    The latest Kodak Motion Picture Products catalog shows D-19 still available:

    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedFiles/QA_MotionPictureCatalog_August_15_2012.pdf

    Page 37, catalog number 1464593, packet of powder to make 1 gal, $12.88 each, minimum order quantity of 20.

    (Not that I think you really want to use D-19 here, but just in case someone else happened along this thread and did want to use D-19...)

    Duncan
     
  11. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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    If anyone cares to use D-19, it is a published formula, and Freestyle Photo carries it by the individual package, if you don't need a whole case!

    Charlie