Kodak B&W Reversal processing formulae

Kodak B&W Reversal processing formulae

  1. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Ian Grant submitted a new resource:

    Kodak B&W Reversal processing formulae - Kodak B&W Reversal processing formulae

    Read more about this resource...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2016
  2. dr5chrome

    dr5chrome Member

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    This formula will produce less than satisfactory positives.

    I wish I could enlighten.

    There will be published reversal tips in the upcoming new edition of the Darkroom Cookbook / Anchel
     
  3. OP
    Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Your logic amazes me. These are well tried and tested Kodak Formulae, the fact that you might not be able to get good results using them is another issue entirely.

    The first developer is fairly standard for use with B&W Reversal of stills and Cine film, as are the bleach and clearing bath.

    So lets look forward to any revelations or insights there may be in the new Anchell book.

    One thing you seem to forget is that B&W reversal processing has been around a long time, plenty of very good reliable information is available from a very wide variety of sources. There are still labs around capable of extremely high quality B&W reversal processing of Cine film, and in the past there were an awful lot more. Some of these labs would typically have been processing as much film per day as you probably process in a month or even possibly year. So what makes you think you or your dr5 process is any better than others.
     
  4. AutumnJazz

    AutumnJazz Member

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    Ian, I can't wait for the rest of your found formulas. (Yes, I remember your post.)
     
  5. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I have to agree with Ian. This process has given results that have even been used in Hollywood production, albeit years ago.

    PE
     
  6. OP
    Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    More to come

    AutumnJazz, I'm slowly going through what I have with me, soon I'll post a number of alternative first developers some with and some without silver solvents (thiosulphate/thiocyanate), along with alternative bleaches (that's alternatives to permanganate/bichromate).

    For instance one first developer system is rather like using Dr Beers Variable Contrast print developer, the balance of Hydroquinone/metol is varied to increase or decrease the contrast of the final positive.

    Plus a variety of Second developers & alternatives to enable users to produce a whole range of different tones and colours in the final positives. This will enable skilled users to have far more control over their output than could ever be possible using a commercial laboratory.

    Also ways to improve or modify commercially processed positives. Before dr5 takes offence at that I'm talking about how to improve under or over exposed positives or change image tone & colour on Black & White home processed, Scala, dr5 or any other commercial B&W positives.

    Ian
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 29, 2008
  7. EASmithV

    EASmithV Subscriber

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    And you can't because?
     
  8. aca91

    aca91 Member

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    It has been a long time since the last answer to this post, so maybe it is too dated. Anyhow, some time ago I made a project, and I developed cine in my darkroom thanks to help from members of APUG. The main problem was that in my country, some chemicals (metol for example) are impossible to find. I managed to complete the process by adding 10g of hypo to 1L of Dektol stock (1st developer) for 8m at 20Cº using TRI-X (super 8) film. The bleach I used was R-9 (1 L water + Potassium dichromate 9.5g + Sulfuric acid 12ml). I remembered I had problems with a potassium permanganate bleach. As a second developer I used dektol without Hypo. Here is a link to the thread:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/82179-no-d94-available-reversal-processing-tri-x-super-8-a-3.html

    I know this may not be as technical as I would like it to be, but is one of the most fascinating discoveries I made in my darkroom thanks to APUG. I also believe that I have to give it back some how, and I think that a complete ignorant on chemestry (like me) or a student on a budget (like me) or a third worlder without access to metol (like me) may find this cheap and easy solution helpful.

    I Hope someone would read this.
     
  9. filmcarnivore

    filmcarnivore Member

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    This is awesome. Thanks for posting.
     
  10. vdonovan

    vdonovan Member

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    Awesome indeed. I followed your earlier link with great interest because I want to start processing super 8 film myself. I haven't tried it yet, but I'm looking forward to using your formula as a starting point. It's great to know that you have used it, that it works, and you've passed it on to the APUG community.
     
  11. Jan Normandale

    Jan Normandale Member

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    Hi Ian a lot of time has passed since your 2008 response captioned above regarding posting:

    "I'm slowly going through what I have with me, soon I'll post a number of alternative first developers some with and some without silver solvents (thiosulphate/thiocyanate), along with alternative bleaches (that's alternatives to permanganate/bichromate)."

    I'm wondering if you have any formulae to post? Thanks!

    Jan
     
  12. OP
    Ian Grant

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    I did post a lot more Reversal formulae in the Resources section, they are under Developers Non Staining.

    Ian
     
  13. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Subscriber

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    As I mentioned on another reversal thread, dichromate bleaches are no longer recommended. Dichromate is highly toxic and most waste disposal systems have regulations against its discharge. It is also believed to be carcinogenic. Potassium permanganate is much safer and is readily available from suppliers of water softening supplies. It is recommended by Ilford for their reversal process. Permanganate will work but you must follow Ilford's directions closely. The following site describes their method and gives formulas.

    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/applications/page.asp?n=90
     
  14. flavio81

    flavio81 Member

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    Hi Ian, thanks for keeping this thead alive. In 2008 you mentioned that you'll publish alternative bleaches, do you have some formulas that don't use dichromate or permanganate? I've read about some formulas using hydrogen peroxide + citric acid (or acetic acid) but there is little information out there on them.
     
  15. OP
    Ian Grant

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    Hi Flavio, I'd have to dig out my notes from 2008 and that wouldn't be easy at the moment (time wise or logistically). Various other compounds have been used in Reversal bleaches Ceriun Sulphate, Copper Sulphate, Ammonium/Sodium/Potassium Persulphate.

    I have used Copper Sulphate reversal but only as part of the etch-bleach process, normally the remaining gelatin and silver halide just takes up dye but you can also re-develop it, normally you'd fix it before the dye bath.

    Ian
     
  16. Taylor Page

    Taylor Page Member

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  17. OP
    Ian Grant

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    Over exposure particularly to daylight during re-exposure can cause odd reversal effects (a bit like solarisation), there's quite a lot of tolerance though with artificial light. 2½ minutes with a 500w lamp is too long, use the normal room lighting or a table lamp, if it's more modern tungsten halide or LED bulb use the equivalent of the 60w or 150w bulbs and the recommended distance.

    Ian
     
  18. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Gerald, clicking on this link results in Error 404 =Not Found. This may be connected to the launch of the new Ilford site where it is no longer clear how one gets to any Ilford articles. Any ideas how one gets to the above or indeed any articles?

    The new site seems only to be geared up to sell.

    I have addressed this to Gerald but only as it was his post with the helpful link but anyone who knows where to go to get to the article can answer

    Thanks

    pentaxuser
     
  19. Taylor Page

    Taylor Page Member

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    Just finished processing Fomapan double 8 using this process. Only difference I used permanganate bleach. Really confused on why my film came out the way it did. Uploaded a picture of the results. Does it look like an in camera issue or developing issue :blink::blink:.
     

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