Kodak D-11 Developer

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Loopy, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. Loopy

    Loopy Member

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    I picked up a couple bags today while I was browsing around, for the price... I couldn't help myself.

    I'm trying to get into developing my own b&w negatives, but this is something I haven't done for years and when I did I didn't have to worry about chemicals, they were provided..

    I tried to search the web for information and developing times but came up with nothing. Does anything know of any information or websites relating to this developer?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    D 11 is a high contrast developer, used for lith and developing plates for the electronics industry. I would not use for any other type of film or work.
     
  3. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    Some you might want to consider instead include Kodak's D-76, HC-110, or XTOL; Ilford's ID-11 (which is functionally identical to D-76); or Agfa's Rodinal. These are just some of the more popular general-purpose developers (although Rodinal is most often recommended for slow films because it produces larger grain than some of the others). There are lots more, and I mean no offense to anybody whose favorite I've omitted; these are just the ones that came immediately to mind as being popular. Their popularity means that you're likely to find developing times for them for whatever film you're using, if not in the film box or the developer's package, then at the Massive Dev Chart.
     
  4. Loopy

    Loopy Member

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    Thanks for the quick replies, and the recommendations. ^_^
     
  5. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Rather than toss the D 11 you can experiment to see if will work with paper.
     
  6. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    Your D-11 **MIGHT** work for film and paper if you dilute it enough. I've never tried it, so call it an experiment and be an Evil Scientist for a couple of hours.
     
  7. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Once in a very tight spot I developed Tx in Dektol, I dont recall the dilution but it worked much better than I would have thought at the time, good tones and very sharp, the grain was not a problem for the small prints needed for 1/2 tones for the wire.
     
  8. Loopy

    Loopy Member

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    So I can use it with paper too? Well I'll definatly keep it around and experiement.

    Thanks everyone for replying!
     
  9. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    The Morgan and Morgan Compact Photo-Lab-Index (1977 edition) lists Kodak Developer D-11 as "An Elon-Hydroquinone Process Developer for Process and Panchromatic Process Films & Plates." Developing directions are: Develop about 5 minutes in a tank or 4 minutes in a tray at 68 deg. F. When less contrast is desired, the developer should be diluted with an equal volume of water.

    Kodak D-11 stock solution is a less energetic developer than Kodak D-72 stock solution(the precursor of Dektol).

    However, if you compare the D-11 stock solution with D-72 stock diluted 2:1 (as you do for developing enlarging papers) the two should be fairly close to each other in performance.

    D-11 stock (developing agents, sulfite & alkali)
    Elon (Metol)---------------------------1 gram/liter
    Hydroquinone--------------------------9 grams/liter
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)-------------75 grams/liter
    Sodium Carbonate (monohydrated)-----30 grams/liter

    D-72 stock (developing agents, sulfite & alkali)
    Elon (Metol)----------------------------3 grams/liter
    Hydroquinone--------------------------12 grams/liter
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)-------------45 grams/liter
    Sodium Carbonate (monohydrated)------80 grams/liter
     
  10. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    From what I understand, most B&W developers can be used with both film and paper, but few are really ideal for both -- they may produce too much grain with film, or too much fog with paper, or whatever. Since you're new to it (or coming back after a long gap), it's probably best to start out with more conventional developers, then pull out the unconventional ones once you've got some practice and know what the conventional items do. If you've not yet mixed it, chances are your D-11 will last for years without going bad, so there's no rush to use it right away.
     
  11. JonPorter

    JonPorter Member

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    The only disadvantage is it isn't very economical since you need to use a lower dilution than with film. I can't vouch for ID-11, but I've used HC-110, Rodinal and FX-39 as paper developers and they've worked fine.