Kodak Day-load tank - how to?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by eumenius, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. eumenius

    eumenius Member

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    Hello friends,

    recently I have acquired an old day-load 35mm developing tank by Kodak, apparently a nice gift from 1950s, made of bakelite. It has a cassette compartment with a knife, and a two-spiral reel - looks like some kind of odd bulk film loader. It is exactly the same model as (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=29993&item=3870017015&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW) The question is simple - how on earth should I operate this machine? :smile: I can understand how the film should go there, and how to cut the film and pour in the reagents - but the film end obviously needs to be cut in SOME SPECIAL way, apparently! Does anyone know how to do it with such a thing?

    Thanks in forward, and regards from Moscow - Zhenya
     
  2. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    I have one of these. It's not that hard, but I don't recommend using it. The potential pitfalls are many. There is a reason they have not been around for decades.

    If you do not have a darkroom, you can still process film. But, you need reels and tanks and a changing bag to load them.

    Good luck.

    Greetings from Texas.

    David
     
  3. bobfowler

    bobfowler Subscriber

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    YIKES! I just KNEW that I forgot to mention something in the "worst piece of photo junk" thread! These tanks are crap of the highest magnitude...
     
  4. John Bartley

    John Bartley Member

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    Hehehe, Maybe Zehnya should not use it, but keep it as a collectable. "Bakelite" items of any kind are very desirable among some antiques collectors, and depending on how much he spent on it, it just might show him a profit some day.

    cheers
     
  5. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    I hit the eBay address. Shouldn't have. This is sure to bring back nightmares.

    Perhaps there is a "special way" to cut the end of the film. I tried, but couldn't find it, if it did exist.

    It was a satisfying Pistol Range Target.
     
  6. eumenius

    eumenius Member

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    He-he, John, you should have seen our old Soviet tanks, perhaps some ugly replicas of Zeiss design :smile:) That's why I ask you to help me with old good Anscomatic :smile: Well, that piece of bakelite from Kodak costed me about $2 on Moscow flea market, so if everyone says it's a nightmare to use I will just keep it as a rarity :smile: I planned to develop some 35mm while in a trip somewhere in the fields, but I don't shoot much 35mm at all, though. The tank is still an enigma in terms of using it, though the replies were up to time really full of emotions :smile: How much of precious films have been jammed by these bakelite monsters during the last 50 years, that's the question? :smile:
     
  7. Fredrick Van Atta

    Fredrick Van Atta Subscriber

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