Kodak discontinues T-MAX P3200 Film (TMZ)

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by olwick, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. olwick

    olwick Member

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    From their Facebook page:

    We wanted to update you on a change to our film portfolio. Due to low sales volume, Kodak is ending production of KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX P3200 Film (TMZ). The demand for ultra-high speed B&W film has declined significantly, and it is no longer practical to coat such a small volume of product.

    The suggested replacement is KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX 400 Film (TMY-2). The latitude of TMY-2 allows it to handle one stop of underexposure (EI 800) without being pushed. In low light situations, TMY-2 delivers very good results when exposed at EI 1600 with increased development time.

    You can find more information here about the remaining portfolio, as well as information on sheet films available through special order at K. B. Canham Cameras, Inc. http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/films/filmsIndex.jhtml?pq-path=13319
     
  2. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Sad but not surprising.
     
  3. AgX

    AgX Member

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  4. NB23

    NB23 Member

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    This is my ultimately favorite film. That's a true bummer.
     
  5. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    It leaves the really fast field almost exclusively to Ilford in 135mm and completely exclusively if you are a 120 user.

    pentaxuser
     
  6. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

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    :sad: This makes me sad.
     
  7. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    I really like TMZ and have a few rolls still in the freezer. Unfortunately it doesn't keep well even frozen or I'd stock up.

    I like Delta 3200 too and have been using TMZ in 35mm and Delta 3200 in 120. I think TMZ is slightly finer grained and slightly faster, or at least capable of slightly higher effective speed, but I can do ok with Delta 3200 for my high speed needs. Still, :sad:
     
  8. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Subscriber

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    "Due to low sales volume at Kodak, Kodak is ending production of KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX P3200 Film (TMZ). The demand for Kodak's ultra-high speed B&W film has declined significantly, and it is no longer practical for Kodak to coat such a small volume of product."

    No. We all know what the suggested replacement really is...

    Other film-related companies, including other film manufacturers, continue to aggressively market and reintroduce or expand their product lines, including the introduction of new films, new high-end film processing equipment, new chemistries, and even new film cameras. They are doing this because the markets are there and they want to fill them.

    Sorry, but it is what it is.

    :sad:

    Ken
     
  9. AgX

    AgX Member

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    to be fair:

    which manufacturer is agressively marketing highest-speed b&w film? The only other other company left offering such film is IlfordPhoto, and they just keep a long going product on the market.

    None of the new introduced films of any company was in this field.
     
  10. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    While that's true, it's good enough for me. Delta 3200 is an excellent film, and it's been available all along in 120.
     
  11. John Bragg

    John Bragg Member

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    What's next to go ? I never needed it myself but always sad to see another film disappear. Long live Ilford.
     
  12. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Subscriber

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    Conversely, Kodak has also discontinued many, many other non-high speed films in the recent past. Including, for instance, Plus-X. And other companies are as we speak introducing new medium-speed b&w films into that market niche.

    Kodak's problem isn't high-speed film. That's just a symptom of the problem, not the problem in itself. Which was the true point of my post. In the midst of some encouraging reports from Photokina right now regarding new or resurrected products, we have one very sick company continuing to discontinue long-time products. The point is to not read this as a generalized indicator of the health of the analog market. Kodak is no longer the industry leader. They are an isolated case.

    Ken
     
  13. ric_kb

    ric_kb Member

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    it is tempting to stock up... BUT
    instead, if I may suggest, buy from Ilford -- keep them making high speed film...

    sadly, my last purchases of P3200 expire next summer...
     
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  15. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    That's fine with me, I preferred Delta 3200 anyway. Sucks though, just another film gone.
     
  16. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Subscriber

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    Hi AgX,

    Return PM set...

    :smile:

    Ken
     
  17. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    Mind if I ask why? TMZ seems slightly finer grained and slightly faster, though the finer grain was more than made up for by the fact Delta 3200 is available in 120.

    Still, I like Delta 3200 a lot and it looks really superb for the speed when shot at 3200 in my Mamiya 645.
     
  18. NB23

    NB23 Member

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    P3200 is Genuine.
    No other film gives me bite and mood as well as this film. Geez!

    (picture of a 16x20 fb print, shot on xpan. P3200 exposed at 3200 and developed in HC110:B)
     

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  19. piu58

    piu58 Member

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    > None of the new introduced films of any company was in this field.

    There is perhaps an exception. Maco sells a special developer for RPX 400 film (which is the same or at least similar to Kentmere 400). It is not hard to get 1000 ASA form this combination. This value us the "unpushed" ASA from both, TMZ and Delta 3200. I tried all that out.
    Please read here: http://www.macodirect.de/rollei-p-2274.html
    The example images are mine.

    I know a 400 ASA film and a special developer is not quite the same as an native 1000 ASA film (which the TMZ and Delta products in reality are). But hits the same market.
     
  20. xtolsniffer

    xtolsniffer Member

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    It's Delta 3200 for me now then.
     
  21. mikebarger

    mikebarger Subscriber

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    I don't shoot the high speed films, and looking at the grain in Delta 3200, I'm glad I don't. Yes, I know many different opinions make up our hobby (a good thing). Big grain just isn't one of my likes. :smile:
     
  22. xtolsniffer

    xtolsniffer Member

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    I like the grain sometimes, it can add something beyond 'I need a fast film to catpure that'. Taken with Kodak T-Max P3200.
     

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  23. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    Freestyle has this film on clearance for $12.99/roll. Ilford's 3200 in $8.00+ at regular price. No wonder sales were poor.
     
  24. erikg

    erikg Member

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    TMZ was brought into the market too late really. It came out just as newspapers were switching en masse to color printing, going over to high speed color negative films. I had hoped at the time that we would soon see it in 120 but they never made the jump. I'm glad Ilford did. Hate to see anything get dropped these days but I do know other ways to get nice grain.
     
  25. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Finally! TMZ is used by many, not for its high speed, but BECAUSE of its grain, sharpness, and incredible tonality.

    If anybody that uses it says 'it looks just like old Tri-X' then I am not surprised. Because to me it does too. It is possibly my favorite film, and one that I'm not able to afford anyway, unfortunately, due to its high price, but it's sad to lose it nonetheless. Beautiful film, in every way.
     
  26. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Freestyle has started a net tactic of raising the prices of outgoing products. $12.99 is what they charge today. Just last week they charged $9.99. Scalping, if you ask me. See what happened to the Efke films? They got their prices raised too as the factory announced its closing too.