Kodak Ektalure?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by peters8, May 1, 2013.

  1. peters8

    peters8 Member

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    Hola my friends!could you give me all the informations,opinions or comments about this old paper?thanks:smile:
     
  2. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    Ektalure was the last of Kodak's line of warm-toned portrait papers. It has a shorter tonal range than other enlarging papers, and is made only in one grade. It has not been made in about 10 years or so, and any that has not been frozen may show some fog.

    When processed with a warm-tone print developer and toned in dilute selenium toner, it produces beautiful cool chocolate-brown tones. Adding 5 grams of potassium bromide to a liter of working strength print developer should both inhibit fog and increase the warmth of the tones. It is a slow paper so enlarging will take a little more exposure than for faster papers, and it needs a full 5 minutes of fixing in fresh fixer with frequent agitation. Rinse it in a running water bath for a few minutes after fixing and before looking at it in room light. It changes. Be sure to keep all your developing solutions at the same temperature - the paper can get very coarse "pepper grain" if solutions go from hot to cold.

    Ektalure was designed with studio portraiture in mind. Its short tonal scale helps separate delicate skin tones. It's a beautiful paper. There is no reason not to use it for other purposes, just be aware that you may not be able to render adequate shadow detail in landscapes without adjusting your film exposure and development.
     
  3. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    I've got some I bought supposedly frozen and now in my freezer. How dilute should the ST be and for how long?
     
  4. mfohl

    mfohl Subscriber

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    I think I have about half a package in my basement, but it is old and has not been refrigerated. I don't have much hope for it.
     
  5. rthomas

    rthomas Subscriber

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    Whenever I see a thread that mentions the name Ektalure, my heart skips a beat.

    Camera store I worked at while in school had a bunch; I and several classmates bought it all when the store decided to stop carrying it. Sadly that was 1998 and it's all gone now. I used it for hand-coloring with reasonable success.
     
  6. Guillaume Zuili

    Guillaume Zuili Member

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    It's simply a beauty... Amazing lith colors too.
     
  7. Rich Ullsmith

    Rich Ullsmith Subscriber

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    If you have some, it's probably toast by now. PM me, and I will help you dispose of it in a proper manner.
     
  8. zsas

    zsas Member

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    This paper, old and fogged, developed with some aids (BZT + potassium bromide + Liquidol) prints nice n beautiful....fog is gone....check out some of my recent experiments below...Intend to think this paper is immortal (errr....made with cadmium)...
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum41/78292-ektalure.html
     
  9. peters8

    peters8 Member

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    Thanks!does this paper lith?
     
  10. peters8

    peters8 Member

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    What do you think about that?