Kodak Ektar f7.7 203mm help needed

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by kameraobskura, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. kameraobskura

    kameraobskura Member

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    Hi,

    Im new to this and just bought my first LF camera. It came with a Kodak Ektar f7.7 203mm on a Supermatic shutter and after searching almost everywhere I was wondering about two functions on the shutter (marked in red).
    What do they do? The button is marked with an X on the back..

    I read somewhere if I want x-sync it has to be set to F and with some easy modification I can turn it into X? How easy is it? Also read that set to F and fired with electronic flash the flash would be 1/3 to 1/2 stop down. Correct?

    Skjermbilde 2012-06-12 kl. 22.49.06.png Skjermbilde 2012-06-12 kl. 22.49.37.png
     
  2. rjbuzzclick

    rjbuzzclick Member

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    I believe it will fire on X-sync regardless of the M or F setting as long as you don't slide the other lever you've marked before firing the shutter. That lever engages the flash delay mechanism, which will be M or F depending on how the M/F slider is set.
     
  3. Old-N-Feeble

    Old-N-Feeble Member

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    Is the rear lens cell missing?
     
  4. luisalegria

    luisalegria Member

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    The button is supposed to open the shutter even if its set to a speed other than B or T, for quick focusing.
    There is a similar button on some Wollensak Raptars.
    This does not work on the one Supermatic I've got though.
     
  5. vet173

    vet173 Member

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    yes. If this is the way you received this lens take it back and get the rest, or your money back. This is NOT a complete lens.
     
  6. Dan Fromm

    Dan Fromm Member

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    That may be because you're not using the press focus button properly. To use it, cock the shutter and then trip the shutter while holding the button in. To close the shutter, cock and trip again.

    I have the same question as broken-down-not-very-old man. Where's the rear cell?
     
  7. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Sure is.
     
  8. kameraobskura

    kameraobskura Member

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    Thanks for the info guys. Really helpful! :smile: now I just need a bipost to female hot shoe and I´ll be all set for x-sync studio photography.

    The lens however is not missing its rear lens cell, I took this picture just after I removing it from the lens board :smile:

    The flash delay level is somewhat stuck in "x-sync" and the shutter is slow on low speeds. I read that there is someone who does repair on shutters like this?
     
  9. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    If you want to use the lens soon, or finding a repair-person is difficult or too expensive, try just exercising the shutter by firing it a hundred times or so (seriously). The amount of "fix" this is sometimes capable of effecting amazes me. If, after a hundred or so shots, the speeds remain seriously slow or erratic, have it cleaned. Another quick fix is a hair dryer. Try a little moderate heat on the shutter during an exercise session. It's an old repairman's trick that sometimes works. I have heard three or four reasons why it works; none is completely believable, but it does seem to help at times.
     
  10. johnielvis

    johnielvis Member

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    mine works on x synch with the thing set all the way on f

    TEST IT to be sure--you want to be confident right--so when you get the synch cord (paramount is where I got mine) just fire the lens looking through it at the flash...if you see the flash through it then it's working...if you dont' see a full aperature or you see shutter blades, then you will have problems.
     
  11. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    The button is used to hod the shutter open for focusing. Cock the shutter and press the button while also releasing the shutter. The shutter will stay open you close it by cocking it again.

    The lever cocks the flash synchronization gear train. For flashbulbs, you cock the shutter, then cock the synchronization, then release the shutter. Without flash or for X sync, just ignore it (making sure it is all the way to the left as you face the lens).
     
  12. bkarasek

    bkarasek Subscriber

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    Hello, What are the 3 or 4 reasons you have heard?
     
  13. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Heat reduces the viscosity of the old oil and grease. That is the only reason, and it is not a substitute for proper maintenance.
     
  14. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    Nothing is really a substitute for proper care and maintenance. True. But I have heard that the exercise does tend to loosen up shutters when dust and old grease have created a sort of "threshold of resistance" to movement that is overcome by moving the parts back and forth through the timing cycles. I have also heard that it redistributes the old lubricants and that it releases tension built up in parts under spring lad over the years––in other words, when a shutter is left in tension (not set on "T"), the metal begins to deform slightly. Releasing that tension through use helps the parts realign. Another helpful trick that seems to support this last bit is to use a hair dryer to warm the shutter for a few minutes before the exercise.

    All of this may be complete bull. All I do know is that I have had some luck with long-unused shutters after exercising them. A proper cleaning and lubrication (only where indicated on a particular shutter– some were designed to run dry) is a far better bet in the long run.
     
  15. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    1) Metal that is deformed has been stressed beyond it's elastic limit, it has no 'memory' and will not go back to it's original shape.

    2) Warming the shutter wil help release any 'grip' the old contaminated lubricants may have formed.

    3) Warming the shutter will, by reducing the viscosity, help redistribute the old, deteriorated, contaminated lubricants. This is not a good thing.

    4) if you value the longevity, accuracy, and reliability of a shutter or any mechanism you will have it cleaned, lubricated, and adjusted by a competent technician.