Kodak Film Calibration

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Stephen Frizza, Mar 11, 2008.

  1. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    This is a film sample supplied from Kodak. One frame is exposed at normal one frame is a stop under and one frame is a stop over. I have scanned the film strip in its entirety. It is a strip of the their Kodak 400 MAX film. You use this to figure out the proper filtration for your enlarger so that when printing, assuming the photographer has lit the subject appropriately and the film is developed normally you will have the correct filtration. I just put it here so people could see it if they haven't seen it before. Maybe someone here knows more about these than me but thats my layman's explanation as to what this is.

    ~Steve
    The Lighthouse Lab
     

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  2. David Grenet

    David Grenet Member

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    You're just excited they finally sent you one :tongue:
     
  3. msage

    msage Subscriber

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    Steve
    These are used to set up printer slope (or curve). I believe most are two stops under and two stops over. After adjusting the printer to produce a good match with the "normal" , you print & adjust the under and overs until you produce matches. After that, in theory, the printer (with a good experienced operator) would put out good work.
    In the "old days" we spend a good deal of time and paper testing "channels" on the printer to put out good, consisant work.
    Now days, the set up is easier (I think :smile: ), but we spend a lot of time chasing down problems with computers, software issues, network problems and so on.
    Michael



     
  4. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    Hey Msage, I wasn't aware it was 2 stops. but now you mention it yes it is two stops. Thanks for this information. I had an idea what it was but i wasn't able to get any information on them down here. Are these made for all film types by kodak?
     
  5. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber

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    I wonder whatever happened to Shirley? The old timers will know what and who and I am referring to.
     
  6. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    Shirley is the Kodak film plotting sheets yes?
     
  7. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    can you give me information on where this shirley thing originated from and what exactly is was?
     
  8. msage

    msage Subscriber

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    Stephen
    Shirley was the name of the live model that was in the original test up negative. She was chosen because she had "normal" Caucasian skin. She would be photographed thousand of times in a set up with gray scale and color patches targets. When she retired, and was replaced by another model and the name stuck. One Kodak rep (back in the old days when Kodak had reps who visited labs) saw the setup and met the current "Shirley". She said it was a good gig, but she had to avoid getting a suntan and other conditions that would alter her appearance. Currently a company named Aperion (?) makes set up negatives & digital set up patches. We purchased a Noritsu mini-lab in 1980 and made our own "shirleys" for a time. Later, Noritsu produced their own with a model they called Nora (Nora Noritsu :D), how funny is that! Sooner or later they all went to mannequins or dummies. No more complaints from the models, no bathroom breaks or lunch breaks.

    The plotting sheets had a publication number like y-55, I think Kodak still makes them? We plot on the computer and have for a number of years. 5 or 6 years ago we were without the computer for a week and the other lab techs were amazed that you could plot with out a computer. Some days I feel really old:smile:.
    We use to have a Kodak Stockhouse dealership and it fun & awe inspiring to see all the things Kodak made.
    Michael



     
  9. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    ah! I knew it had something to do with film calibration etc... HAHAHAHA NORA NORITSU!!!!....sometimes I swear it pisses me off Ive come in at the end of the golden age!
     
  10. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    I've still got the real live Shirley test negs. At least from your descriptions the test negs I was given by the previous owner of the Jobo I now have seem to be the ones to which you refer. I also have a "Lucky" neg from Fuji. It's a neg and "perfect" print of a Japanese girl with a colour chart sitting in a garden. Is it called Lucky because this is her anglicised name? It has set me wondering.

    Despite trying my best and after many prints I couldn't quite replicate all the colours exactly as in the perfect print which was provided. I think it was PE who offered the explanation that either the neg might have faded or the paper on which it was produced which was of course Fuji paper had changed. Certainly Fuji has changed paper since then so at least the second explanation applies.

    Just a "heads up" to those who obtain negs and perfect prints which are several years old. It sounds as if you need to get the latest negs and prints to be able to replicate the "perfect" print.

    pentaxuser
     
  11. Neanderman

    Neanderman Member

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    When I was in college, every Color Darkroom Dataguide came with a Shirley neg. I still have mine. :D

    Ed
     
  12. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    Do you think if I ask Kodak nicely next time they make one of these negs I can be the Shirley? hehehehehe
     
  13. David Grenet

    David Grenet Member

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    I would love to see the reaction of all of the lab techs to that when they receive it :D

    Particularly the ones in Sydney who know you...
     
  14. Michael W

    Michael W Member

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    They'd think "I didn't realise that Steve had such a pretty sister!"
     
  15. Samuel B

    Samuel B Member

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    These negs were used to set the "slope" or to match your "unders" and "overs" to the normal negatives on older analog minilab printers. Later analog minilab printers didn't need them so they became redundant even before digital labs became the norm.
    I believe that the Kodak facility in Melbourne had a "Shirley" set up for making these negatives. Last I heard they were trying to think up a reason to keep making these negs! Shirley has probably ended up in landfill somewhere.
     
  16. Philippe-Georges

    Philippe-Georges Member

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    Dear Stephen,

    If you want it, I can mail you an scanned copy of the Y-55 Process record form, it's a little to large to be attached on this post, for good printing.
    I hope I will not violate Kodak's copyrights...

    Philippe