Kodak Flexicolor SM for developing Portra in a JOBO

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Matthew Cherry, Jul 25, 2012.

  1. Matthew Cherry

    Matthew Cherry Member

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    I just set up my new to me JOBO CPP2 and everything seems to be working just as it should. I'm going to try and process my first batch of C-41 (specifically Portra, both 120 and 4x5) this weekend.

    But, first I need to get chemistry and after reading this forum all morning, my head hurts. That said, my take away is that the best way to go is probably the Kodak SM line of Flexicolor chemistry. I see various kits and I'm not sure what would be the best to get - or if I'm better off purchasing the chemistry individually.

    If anyone uses this chemistry in a jobo, I'd be very keen to know what you order when buying chemistry and what settings you use when processing.

    Thank you in advance!

    Matthew
     
  2. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    There is a sticky in this category where I listed what to get and where to get it. http://www.apug.org/forums/forum40/94134-list-color-chemicals-where-get-them.html But if you are going to get SM chemicals, get this developer kit. I would look for the catalog number on that page and google it since B&H won't ship it. It is the only Kodak kit that does not need a fourth part called "starter". Be aware that the kit I linked to is only the developer, it does not contain the bleach, fixer, or final rinse. If you are going to just try this and see how it goes, get the 1 liter kit from Photographer's Formulary, it contains everything you need and is Kodak brand. If you want to get larger quantities after that, you can get the individual parts and be off to the races.
     
  3. CatLABS

    CatLABS Subscriber

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    I have given this response MANY times - C-41 chems:
    I used Champion photochemistry, i get it at Unique photo in NJ (though there are several places around the US who stock the stuff).
    Easy to read PDF instruction online for free, the chemicals are the cheapest out there, and are easily adaptable to any process.
    Simple 1,2,3 stages\steps single solution mixing (for extremely long shelve life).

    Downside - you have to buy a fairly large amount as the minimum sizes are fairly big. They are so cheap it evens out after the first 50 rolls, then all processing is free.. :smile:
     
  4. Matthew Cherry

    Matthew Cherry Member

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    Thanks guys.

    Greg, I read that sticky and the rest of the thread. I also downloaded the two spreadsheets for separating out chemistry from bulk purchases. The point I'm confused about is the starter replenisher, which is why I'm opting for the SM route - I think that means I avoid that. I guess I wanted to get more than just the one liter kit as that seems kind of small for tweaking the process (I assume I'm going to go through a few rolls of film just getting everything right and consistent).
     
  5. Buje

    Buje Subscriber

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    Matthew, it's not as difficult as it seems. If you mix the chemistry following directions being precise about quantities and use the correct times and temperatures, there should be little reason for tweaking the process. C-41 and E-6 are pretty exact in their requirements. I would recommend distilled water for all chemistry to avoid all the unknown stuff in tap water. But this is vital... FOLLOW DIRECTIONS! Your first try should be as good as your hundredth. Mine was.

    Paul
     
  6. Matthew Cherry

    Matthew Cherry Member

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    Thanks Paul. I feel fairly confident with the following directions part - I'm more concerned about fine tuning the JOBO after reading many posts on that subject. It seems that there is a bit of trial and error when it comes to that?
     
  7. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    The role of the developer starter is consistency.

    C41 is a standardized, replenished process. The starter takes brand new developer and seasons it so that it works the same as developer that has been used and replenished for 2 or 200 rolls.

    Unseasoned fresh developer can be "too good" to meet the standard.

    That doesn't mean unusable films, just that development might go too far, giving your film a little "push" or some such issue.
     
  8. Buje

    Buje Subscriber

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    Well, you do have to get the water bath temperature right to get the chemistry to the correct temperature. My CPP-2 (early model) seems to need about 0.5C higher setting to get the process temperature correct. I use both a Kodak process thermometer and an electronic one (both agree with each other). I determined that setting using water in the bottles and when all was figured out, I mixed, heated up and processed. I usually start the CPP heating 2-3 hours before I run it. After loading the film, I pre-heat the drum (rolling) for 10 minutes or so depending on the ambient. Great results.

    Of course, correct exposure in the camera plays a big part in success. :D
     
  9. RPC

    RPC Member

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    The starter is for making working solution out of developer replenisher only. It is not for use with ordinary developer. It primarily supplies the halide restrainer the developer needs that the replenisher lacks, as it is not needed for replenishment since the halide is produced as a by-product of development. Therefore if you make a working solution out of replenisher you must add the starter (halide). Ordinary developer mix and used developer already contains the halide.
     
  10. Matthew Cherry

    Matthew Cherry Member

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    You guys are awesome.
     
  11. Matthew Cherry

    Matthew Cherry Member

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  12. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    No, that will not work. It is the bleach only and is made to fit inside a large processing machine. Use the products I listed in the sticky. If in doubt, google the cat numbers I listed there to find a supplier.
     
  13. Matthew Cherry

    Matthew Cherry Member

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    Ok. Off to Photographer's Formulary then....
     
  14. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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  15. tnabbott

    tnabbott Member

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  16. Rolfe Tessem

    Rolfe Tessem Subscriber

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    This is a repeat of a post I made in another thread some time ago. I'm sure prices have changed since then...
    --

    Since Tetenal discontinued their 5 liter kits a couple of years ago, I switched to Kodak and have had great results ordering from http://www.pdisupply.com. I think they largely serve minilabs, but they are happy to ship the small Flexicolor kits. These are the ones with SM in their names -- there are so many that it is a bit tricky trying to find the right stock numbers. To save anyone that trouble, here is what my last order consisted of.


    Qty Prod No Name Options Price
    1 KF51-1925254 KODAK FLEXICOLOR SM Tank Final Rinse 12X3L - - - $22.69
    1 KF50-8462681 KODAK FLEXICOLOR SM Tank Fixer 2X3.9L - - - $59.67
    1 KF49-8824690 (Hazardous Fee) KODAK FLEXICOLOR SM Tank Bleach - - - $57.51
    1 KF48-1756337 (Hazardous Fee) KODAK FLEXICOLOR SM Tank Developer - - - $59.25
     
  17. gmikol

    gmikol Member

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    @Rolfe: What was the total shipping cost (including HazMat?)

    --Greg
     
  18. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    You can get those same chemicals from www.pfsny.com and they ship by UPS without Hazmat, just by weight. If I remember correctly, all of those shipped to me for under $30 when I lived in Miami.