Kodak Gold in D-76/T-Max developer

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Ektagraphic, Mar 24, 2012.

  1. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

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    Hello-
    I have some Kodak Gold that I would like to experiment by developing in D-76 or in T-Max developer. Does anyone have an ideas as to what developing times I should use? Has anyone had any success with this?

    Thanks,

    Patrick
     
  2. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    You'll have better success using in a higher contrast developer such as D-72/Dektol. It's been years since I've done it, you'll need to experiment for time. You will also need to print on high contrast paper or filtering for decent prints, grade 4-5 are best.
     
  3. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    While I can't give you a developing time, I did try this with Superia 200 once, and I got negs that could be scanned, but printed very poorly. The orange RA-4 mask that's built into the film base acts as a very low contrast filter.
     
  4. newcan1

    newcan1 Subscriber

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    I would imagine you can negate the effects of the orange mask if you use a dichroic enlarger and dial in the opposite filters?
     
  5. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Well, adding yellow and magenta is to 'remove' blue and green, which is what the paper is sensitive to. With the mask being orange, I don't know if there is enough blue and green left to be removed to have a proper paper exposure.
    I've never heard of anyone that was entirely successful of getting great black and white prints from C41 color neg film processed in b&w chemistry. Unless you had Kodak Panalure, of course, which was panchromatically sensitive to light, same as color papers, and had to be printed in total darkness.
     
  6. newcan1

    newcan1 Subscriber

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    You raise an interesting point: using panchromatic paper. The easiest way out here would be to print the negatives on color paper.

    But regarding my original suggestion: I believe that when you use multicontrast b&w filters, yes, orange may be low contrast, but magenta is higher contrast. I think a typical dichroic head could almost certainly provide the filtration to bring the contrast up. I would use a color analyser, get a reading of say a grade three filtration with a true b&w neg, then put the c-41 b&w neg in and adjust the filtration for the same reading. Probably a dichroic head would have enough filtration.
     
  7. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    There's only one way to find out. I remember how our master printer at the photo lab I used to work at would smile at me and say, 'you know, if you ever need any b&w prints made from color negs, let me know'... :smile: I never took him up on his offer, but decided that he must have been using Panalure. With C-41 film in b&w film, you obviously don't have the colors to deal with, but the orange mask instead, and a silver image that is probably not of the same density as a normal b&w negative, but don't quote me on that.
     
  8. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

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    RickA is correct. For some reason C-41 types 'need' powerful B&W developers if you are to attain sufficient contrast. - David Lyga