Kodak HIE Processing (D76/DDX)

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Nikkorray, Jul 20, 2005.

  1. Nikkorray

    Nikkorray Member

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    I just got a hold of expired (6/2004) Kodak HIE for $1.49 USD per roll. Yahooo!!!! I've been researching the web & people seem to recommend straight D76 (no dilution) as the best approach to developing it. This is great because I carry 2 developers at home: D76 & DDX. However, I may have a problem using D76 with no dilution since the outside temperature is currently running at 100 degrees Fahrenheit with no relief in site. I may not get the optimal developing temp of 68 degrees unless I cool it down with a 1:1 dilution. Will diluting it cause too much of a problem? Also, has anyone used DDX for HIE and if so, at what time & dilution? Thanks in advance for all responses.
     
  2. aj-images

    aj-images Member

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    Nik - I use D-76 for HIE straight. I develop at 24 degrees. Times vary from 10-12 minutes, depending on lighting conditions. I have developed at 20 degrees and the developer did not activate. To cool down, I simply put the developer in the fridge. I do recommend a pre-wash, as IR is notorious for pinholes. Best of luck.
     
  3. colrehogan

    colrehogan Member

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    Diluting D76 will not cause a problem.
     
  4. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

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    Kodak HIE infra red film is capable of beautiful surreal prints from a good negative, Kathy Harcom is quite well known in the UK for her B&W prints made from using this film and uses ID11, undiluted for 11 minutes.(20C/68F)
    You can buy a copy of her book called:Light Sensitive from Arem Publishing.
    www.arempublishing.co.uk
    Another book that I suggest is: Infra-Red Photography by Hugh Milsom published by Foutain Press ISBN 0 86343 373 1, both books have technical advice of getting the best from these type of films including exposure, processing, printing, lith printing and choice of photographic papers etc.
    There is also a portfolio of prints from photographers such as Sir Simon Marsden, Tony Worobiec, Pete Burkett, Ray Spence, Theresa Airey,
    Stuart Black as well as Hugh`s own work.
    Tim Rudman is another prolific user of infra red film too, and is having workshops held at the Photographic Centre Northwest in Seattle www.pcnw.org in September and then at the Photographers Formulary in Montana www.photoformulary.com in October.
    Sorry, but I can`t find times for use with DD-X, perhaps Ilford can help.
     
  5. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    Five minutes in my frig will cool 8 oz of D76 from 75 to 68. A quart of water kept in the frig at all times will dilute some tap water in a print tray to 68 for a water bath.

    Or a few ice cubes will cool down a gallon of tap to be used for water bath and/or wash water. Use the Ilford archival wash sequence and you can wash in 24 oz of water.

    Don`t forget the developer in the frig or all the chemicals will precipitate out.
     
  6. Nikkorray

    Nikkorray Member

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    Thanks Aj & Ronald for the fridge solution. I thought about it but figured it would take too long but 5 minutes sounds like a reasonable amount of time to wait.