kodak medalist II question

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by vedmak, Jul 4, 2010.

  1. vedmak

    vedmak Subscriber

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    Recently I picked up a medalist camera, it needs to be milled or otherwise modified to take 120 film, I've heard there used to be mod kits sold for that job, is there a manual, or a repair manual that could offer some guidance?
     
  2. Mark Fisher

    Mark Fisher Subscriber

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    Most people seem to either re-roll onto either 620 or get it reworked. From what I understand, it can be reworked to either use 120 film or 120 film with a 620 take up spool. Ken Ruth is the person most people refer to get it done. I think that Manfred Schmidt will the 620 take up spool. I had a Medalist and intended to get this work done wit Ken Ruth, but never managed to do it. I had a manual at one time, but it definitely did not mention a conversion kit. Kodak made 620 so that people would buy Kodak film so I can't imagine that they offered such a kit...I've never heard of one.....sorry for not answering your question, but my research at the time showed that the only way to do it was milling a bunch of parts down. Unlike other 620 cameras, the film chamber is physically too small to take 120 film so you need to remove some metal.
     
  3. vedmak

    vedmak Subscriber

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    I can mill the excess metal with my Unimat, however I have heard that in the 1960s there were some conversion kits sold to do exactly that, being logical, I would assume those kits would have some replacement parts, instead of instructions to do it with lathe. I would like to keep the camera as original as possible, but work with 120 spools. Respolling the film from 120 to 620 is an alternative, but then it takes all the fun out of reloading the camera :smile:
     
  4. Trask

    Trask Subscriber

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    I'm not sure what you mean with your final comment, Vedmak -- once you respool onto a 620 core, you can carry the film and reload at will (though I'd use one of the plastic 120 canisters that Adox film comes in to prevent any light leaks. I have a Medalist II and I frequently respool film -- it's easy, once you have the 620 spools. Use that camera -- the Ektar lens is very sharp.
     
  5. vedmak

    vedmak Subscriber

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    by saying it takes all the fun out of reloading the camera, I mean you can only do it it the photo bag, or in the darkroom.
     
  6. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    Although that scheme didn't work as all the film manufacturers started making 620 film too!


    Steve.
     
  7. Trask

    Trask Subscriber

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    vedmak -- no, you're not restricted to reloading the camera in a changing bag or darkroom. Where'd you get that idea? I do have respool the film in a darkroom or changing bag, but once it is respooled, you can load your camera anywhere, though I'd carry the film in a closed 120 film canister or wrapped in aluminum foil to prevent light leaks (just as fresh 120 film comes in a foil pouch). No, you're not restricted when loading the camera.
     
  8. vedmak

    vedmak Subscriber

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    :smile: may be we just have different idea about fun, I would much rather modify the camera to take 120, messing with the film, always adds to the chance that it will become fogged, scratched or both, there is no way of telling if it is completely light tight after you respool.
     
  9. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    Ken Ruth solved the problems years ago, and has more experience doing it than anybody.
     
  10. guitstik

    guitstik Member

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    There is a tutorial about how to modify a 120 roll to fit a six-16 camera. 620 is not a problem as all you have to do is trim down the 120 spools to fit, I do it all the time and it is easier with plastic spools, toe nail clippers. This is the link for converting a six-16 camera to a panoramic 120 shooter.
    http://kodak.3106.net/download/616panoramicconversion-RevBE.pdf
     
  11. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser

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    yup ...
    and he is nice, and honest and does great work to boot!
     
  12. boswald

    boswald Member

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    Blue Moon, who advertise on APUG have a nice variety of films that they modify to fit 620 cameras.
    The prices are quite reasonable, but there is another alternative. Years ago, I made a 'film sharpener'
    with four bits of wood, glue, screws, and two of those blades that come on a nice pencil sharpener.
    Glue two flat pieces along their lengths in a right angle, add two triangles appropriately apart, and
    fasten on the blades. Push the roll into position, and roll to shave. If you haven't a caliper or
    appropriate wrench, make a gauge .
    I sold mine to a student, but he moved away, and I still have my Medalist I !