Kodak Panchromatic Separation Film 2238

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by frobozz, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

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    2238 is a film for making archival separation positives from original color negatives. So it has to be panchromatic; the original negative is just contact printed with red, green, and blue filters in front of the light source for each of the separations. But I thought hey, panchromatic slow speed film with very fine grain... it's like Tech Pan without all the developer hassles! So I got some and finally got a chance to play with it a bit yesterday.

    It's on a clear Estar base which has a very very faint blue tinge to it after developing. (There is a blue dye somewhere in the emulsion that comes out in your developer. If you're not using one-shot developer you might want to run a prewash until the water runs clear.) The specs don't say whether it has an anti-halation layer. Because it's supposed to be contact printed it wouldn't have as much need for one. I'd say it is definitely prone to light-piping through the base, but not as badly as, say, HIE...so there is probably some less-than-normal anti-halation layer in there. It's also not quite as sharp as Tech-Pan in the end, which might be due to some slight halation. Though this would make a really dandy way to make B&W positives from B&W negatives by contacting-printing them, instead of trying to run a reversal process on the original negs!

    It's available direct from Kodak in single roll quantities, though unfortunately that roll is 2000 feet long and costs $750! Here is the spec sheet:

    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedFiles/H-1-2238t.pdf

    I rated it at ISO 25 and ended up liking the results when developing it in ID-11 (D-76) 1:1 for 10 minutes. I also tried Rodinal 1:50 at 6:30 but to my eye that was a little grainier and probably needed a little more time to really develop the ISO 25 metered bracket shot. As you can see from the spec sheet, it can be rated and developed in a wide range of choices, which will affect contrast, etc. I was going for the less contrasty end of things.

    Here are some example shots:


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    If anyone else is interested in playing with this, I could put up some 100' rolls in the classifieds. It's definitely interesting stuff though at least in my tests so far it's not quite the miracle Tech Pan replacement.

    Kodak also sells it in 100' 70mm rolls for $105 each... though you need to buy 18 of them! But any of those folks wondering what to do with their Hasselblad 70mm backs, here's another option!

    Duncan
     
  2. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Fantastic post Duncan; I had no idea this film still existed.

    I might be very well be interested in a 100' roll if you get around to doing that. This might be great for, well... making separations!
     
  3. willrea

    willrea Member

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    Ditto!
     
  4. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

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    OK I put up a post in the For Sale classifieds if anyone wants a roll.

    Something I thought I should point out more strongly: This is Estar base. So you'll need scissors to cut it, no way you can just tear it if that's what you're used to! On the other hand it dries insanely flat and will be dimensionally stable for basically forever, unlike acetate bases which shrink over time.

    Duncan
     
  5. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

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    Oh yeah - this film is edge marked as a 2003 batch of the stuff.

    Duncan
     
  6. bloewy

    bloewy Member

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  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Try a rapid fix, rather than a regular, hardening fix like Kodafix.

    I would avoid a hardening fix as well.
     
  8. bloewy

    bloewy Member

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    Have you tried this? I used regular fixer for a total time of 1 hour. I would think that if it was going to work with any form of Hypo, that would have done it.

    I do have a pound of Hypo. Not fixer, but just Hypo. No hardener. Why would the hardener be a problem?
     
  9. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

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    If it helps at all, I used Ilford Rapid Fix and did nothing special. It cleared quite quickly and thoroughly.

    Duncan
     
  10. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    My guess is that your "hypo" isn't working. Any chance it is actually hypo clearing agent?
     
  11. bloewy

    bloewy Member

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    First I was using Kodak brand Kodafix (Liquid)and then Kodak brand fixer (powder)

    I ran a dest roll of film (color-C-41) through the fixer after it failed to clear this film and it made it quite clear. The fixer works. There is something I'm missing on the 2238.

    I may have to see if my camera store has ilford rapid fix in stock. I cannot imagine it's much different chemically than the Kodak fixer.

    I am wondering if the film that came in my can could be something other than 2238. I will have to take a magnifying glass to the film edges and see if I can find a number.
     
  12. bloewy

    bloewy Member

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    OK, I have a possible lead:

    Rapid fixer vs Hypo fixer.

    Ilford Rapid fixer says 'The fixing agent in Ilford Rapid Fixer is ammonium thiosulphate, it contains no sodium thiosulphate (hypo).'

    Two different chemicals. Do any of the chemists out there know the difference, and why one would not work on this emulsion?
     
  13. bloewy

    bloewy Member

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    Well, I bought a new bottle of Ilford Rapid fixer. Ran the film through it for about an hour. Nothing. The same.

    As a test, I took a new piece of this film, developed in HC110, fixed, and the same. Yellow nearly opaque film.

    I need to get a magnifying glass and see if I can get the edge numbers. So far all I can find is 'Kodak Safety Film". At least its safe.​
     
  14. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    If I read the datasheets about this film (2238) correctly, the only edge-printing you will find is "Kodak Safety Film".