Kodak Portra 400 in tungsten and fluorescent WITHOUT filters

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by nikonF80, Oct 21, 2011.

  1. nikonF80

    nikonF80 Member

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    Hello,

    I use kodak portra 400 as my go-to film when a higher speed is needed. With winter approaching I will be taking more of my pictures indoors. I know portra is a very versatile film so I am looking for tips on exposure compensation without using filters in tungsten and fluorescent lighting.

    I have found that +1 works very well for tungsten light, but I am curious to what other people do.

    I have never shot in fluorescent before. How should I compensate for this type of light?
     
  2. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    For starters, fluorescent light is not constant light; it flickers at 60 Hertz. So your exposure would need to be 1/60 second or longer.

    Then there is a problem with the color spectrum of fluorescent light, which exposure compensation will not address. The only answers that I know about are filtering while taking the photograph or compensation filtering in the darkroom. The former works better than the later.

    If you use a strobe, the strobe illuminated areas will be properly color balanced, the rest not.

    Steve
     
  3. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Do yourself a favor and filter it, or at least use Fuji Pro 400H, which color corrects much more easily in foul light. +1 exposure helps too, in pretty much any light that is not in the 5000 to 6000 K range. That means overcast weather, cloudy weather, shade, and anything but a couple hours each side of mid day.
     
  4. nikonF80

    nikonF80 Member

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    The only reason I didn't want to filter it was because of the reduced speed.
    +1 seems to work perfectly for tungsten lighting. I guess for the florescent I will need a filter. What filter would you recommend? I know there are many different temps for florescent .
     
  5. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    Umm, the filters that would be used for fluorescent or tungsten would ask you to adjust about +1 from normal, so the same adjustment as what you're already planning, right?

    So speed isn't a real issue.
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Umm, for fluorescent it is about one stop, but not for tungsten. Correcting for household tungsten bulbs requires an 80A and an 81B together, and opening up 2-2/3 stops from the metered exposure.
     
  7. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    Dang, I was wrong about somthing again. :sad: Memory is so fallible.

    You are absolutely right, I normally use an 80a which needs a two stop correction.

    I haven't added the 81b, that's something I might have to try but a little tungsten ambiance isn't bad either. :wink:

    The basic thought that I was trying to get across is that in non-standard light, for example tungsten, exposing the blue layer of a daylight film enough to be able to correct well at the enlarger requires roughly the same change of exposure with or without a filter.

    The advantage of using the filter is that the other layers will not be over exposed, relatively speaking.
     
  8. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    Kodak Portra 400, or any other daylight balanced film in fluorescent or tungsten lighting without filters without producing a colour caste is impossible.
     
  9. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Yes, what he said!
     
  10. nikonF80

    nikonF80 Member

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    Ok thanks everyone for the help