Kodak TMAX100 VS Ilford DELTA100

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by davetravis, Nov 20, 2007.

  1. davetravis

    davetravis Member

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    I need to copy my color slides to B&W film only once!
    No time to experiment with too many possibilities.
    I want the sharpest, finest grain, with faithful tonal range repro. I'll be copying 6x7 cm to 4x5 sheet film in my enlarger, and printing up to 20x24 inches.
    Kodak or Ilford, which one?
    Thanks,
    DT
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    TMX is more neutral in this regard, so that's what I'd use for this purpose.
     
  3. fhovie

    fhovie Subscriber

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    I would be amazed if you could tell the difference
     
  4. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Any reason why you're doing the internegative by projection rather than contact? I'm just curious, because I have some 35mm slides I plan to convert the same way, and TMX was my target as well.
     
  5. davetravis

    davetravis Member

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    Well I suppose I could just lay the 6x7 slide onto the 4x5 film in total darkness, and cut it out later. But I think I'll have more control with enlarging and have a bigger neg to play with later. Make sense?
     
  6. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I think it's good to dupe on a larger format.
     
  7. Harrigan

    Harrigan Member

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    The film for choice here would have been ektapan in the old days but tmax should work fine. I prefer doing contact internegs to eliminate the possibility of losing sharpness when making enlarged I-negs. By doing them by contact emulsion to emulsion you'll get the sharpest interneg possible, however it's harder to see dust when doing them by contact.
     
  8. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

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    By doing them by contact emulsion to emulsion you'll get the sharpest interneg possible, however it's harder to see dust when doing them by contact.
    Wouldn`t that make the image laterally reversed?
     
  9. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    35mm slides with a slide copier?
    I would prefer Fuji Acros for that

     
  10. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    No, I was actually going to try with my Leitz ELDIA. It's made for doing B&W slides on blue-sensitive or ortho film (works pretty well, BTW, I have some pretty nice slides from my usual negs), but with a bit of patience and some ingenuity, I thought I could devise a manner to use it with a pan film like TMX.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2007
  11. IloveTLRs

    IloveTLRs Member

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    I'll vote for TMAX, too. I like both films, but I find Ilford to be more contrasty. In my experience both have very little grain (especially TMAX 100 done in TMAX dev.)