Kodak TMY-2@1600 + dektol

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by mohawk, May 24, 2008.

  1. mohawk

    mohawk Member

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    Hey,

    Another one...Well it would be nice to know how I could figure these out myself, get some good understanding about sensitometry, etc...
    If someone could point me to some good links or recommend some books, feel free to do so.

    But for now I just would like to know what dilution+dev time combo will render nice grain with an TMY-2@1600 film in dektol.
     
  2. Chazzy

    Chazzy Member

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    Why would you want to push-process film in a paper developer? "Nice grain" is the last thing that I would expect, although I admit that I have never tried it.
     
  3. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    Exactly what do you mean by "nice grain?"

    Out-of-the-box TMY-2 has sharp, fine grain when it is developed in D-76 and other standard film developers.

    TMY-2 is still pretty sharp and fine grained when developed in print developers like Dektol.

    If what you are after is large, fuzzy, coarse grain - post development, choose a film that was manufactured with large, coarse grain - you will likely have a problem finding such a film, these days. Maybe you can find some EXPIRED ROYAL X pan on eBAY?
     
  4. RidingWaves

    RidingWaves Member

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    Yeah, why do you need to use TMY-2 at 1600, in Dektol? I think 'nice grain' would be better with Xtol or D-76. Or Rodinal. 'Nice Grain' and Dektol are not really compatible. If you must, probably try it at 1:3 for 12 min, 68, might get you in parking lot of the ball park.
     
  5. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    If you want grain, you will have better luck to overexpose a "regular" film, not to underexpose/overdevelop a T-grained film. Try HP5 or Tri-X at 100. Long development times via high dilution will give you more grain (and sharper grain) as well, and also help keep the contrast down to more easily printable levels, as opposed to strong dilutions, which will block up your overexposed film like nobody's business and will give you less grain (and softer grain).

    Using Dektol is a common trick to kick your film in the teeth a bit. I find that D-19 kicks even harder, though. Nonetheless, you probably already have Dektol on hand, while D-19 proves a bit more difficult to locate these days. So I would try a starting test at 1:9 from the stock solution for 8 minutes at 75F, and go from there. This is with Arrowhead distilled water. If you are using your own tap water supply, your times could be radically different from mine.

    Delta super speed film will give a grain "wash" as opposed to gnarly sharp clumpy grain. Yet again, overexposure will increase the grain.

    If your film is too thick to print through after all this craziness, apply Farmer's Reducer as needed. Don't forget to refix and rewash afterward.
     
  6. RidingWaves

    RidingWaves Member

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    Well, at 1:9 for only 8 min (75) D-19 looks to be very strong indeed. I suppose if your going for the grain just for the grain, you could try many stronger formulas. All the research going in to make it fine grain, and we're Trying to make it grainy.
     
  7. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    try dektol 1:3 for about 3-5 mins @ 68ยบ
    you might want to do a test roll before you
    do the main event.

    have fun :smile:

    john
     
  8. Paul Verizzo

    Paul Verizzo Member

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    I've never tried to acquire grainy negs....

    ....but here are my thoughts off of the top of my head. (Some might say acquired from other bodily locations.........)

    1. While you want a very active alkali, you don't want a lot of developing agent(s) in order for the time to remain in bounds. Therefore:

    2. Try dilute Dektol as discussed but add a couple of tablespoons of sodium carbonate to your diluted mix.

    3. Or for a soup on the wild side, 1/2 tsp of sodium hydroxide, i.e. Red Devil Lye or similar. This will pop your gelatin open and let those silver filaments meet and greet throught the emulsion.

    4. Of course, don't use TMY. Why start with a very fine grain film to make it grainy? I would suggest any non-tabular emulsion 400 speed, Tri-X, HP5+, Neopan 1600, APX, Foma, etc.
     
  9. mohawk

    mohawk Member

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    ah yes, I'm pretty new to developing film and although I knew the T-Max serie is T-grain film I had no clue what it actually stood for...:rolleyes:
    Anyways the film came out rather dissapointed as suspected by some of you and didn't really showed an enlarged grain structure. Meanwhile I have tried Tri-X in dektol and while it gave me nice grain, the negatives seem to abit thin. No good separation ? I must say the light was crap as well, but not in all shots and while they show more contrast&separation I stil find them abit dull/thin. Maybe that's how Tri-X looks and I'll have to wait to judge untill I printed some.
    Thanks for the info.
     
  10. gainer

    gainer Subscriber

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    The more I study grain, the less I know about what causes it. Here is a formula that one would expect to produce large grain:

    37.5 g p-amenophenol base.
    63 g ascorbic acid.
    41 g KOH
    water to 1 liter.
    Working solution 1 part + 50 parts water. 8 minutes at 70 F for HP5+.

    Why does it not? Looks like it should be a lith developer.