Korona 8x10 question

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by reellis67, Jun 1, 2006.

  1. reellis67

    reellis67 Subscriber

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    I got my 8x10 yesterday, but I found that it would not mount on my tripod properly because the mounting screw cannot reach the threads in the camera bottom. I'm using a Bogen 3028 head, which works fine with my 4x5 Korona, but for some reason, the tripod mount seems much deeper on the 8x10. If anyone has any suggestions for addressing this problem, I would greatly appreciate it. I don't know how much longer I can stand waiting to make some negatives with this thing!

    - Randy
     
  2. User Removed

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    I'm not quite sure I can picture what you are describing. The bottom of the camera is just a flat surface with the tripod mount pressed into the center of the wood. The tripod screw on your head is not long enough to go up inside of the hole and tighten?

    I've never heard of something like this happening before, so it sounds very odd. Then again, I've never used a Bogen 3028 tripod. Do you have a quick release on it or something? Maybe that is your problem.

    Ryan McIntosh
    www.RyanMcIntosh.net
     
  3. reellis67

    reellis67 Subscriber

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    Upon closer inspection, it appears that the lower part of the threaded mount may have been broken off at some point. Normaly, the mounting screw on the tripod reaches a good ways up, and will often go all the way, into the camera mount. On this camera, the wood hole where the threads should be appears larger than normal, as if there were a brass threaded insert that is now missing. There are threads in the upper half of the camera bottom, but because they only go about half way toward the bottom, the tripod mounting screw cannot reach them. I think that I may be able to replace the brass threaded insert in the wood and solve the problem if I can find one that has the right outer diameter. At first, I thought the camera mount was designed like that, but now I see that it is likely damaged, and will take a little bit of woodwork to fix things up.

    - Randy
     
  4. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Most hardware stores carry brass inserts in various sizes, I have had to replace a few on various cameras, you might want to also get an easy out to help remove the one that is in the camera and broke, that way you can get the full length of the new insert in for the added strength.

    R.
     
  5. reellis67

    reellis67 Subscriber

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    Thanks! I was just giving it the hairy eyeball again and think that the use of a "T-nut" for added strength might be a good idea. I am a little concerned that a brass insert might pull out if the front standard were extended a ways. I'm shooting with a triple convertible (heavy) and the total weight is substantial it seems.

    - Randy
     
  6. User Removed

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    Actually, if I remember right...you purchased that camera off Ebay and the seller noted it had a crack near the tripod mount hole. It might be a good idea to have a wood working place tap out the old one and put a new one in. It sounds to me like it was used quite abit had the threads have just worn out. Those little tripod mounts were just pressed into the wood, and I have heard horror stories about them ripping out while the photographer was caring the camera on the tripod, and the camera go falling over. If you get a new one put in, make sure its put in VERY WELL.

    Your other option would be to purchase a real tripod with a longer bolt that comes out. I use a Ries Model-A head, and the bolt comes up nearly 1/2" or more, so it goes DEEP inside the camera. This is needed when using big heavy cameras, and you do not see very long tripod bolts on some of the smaller tripods.

    I also might suggest taking some action against the seller on Ebay, and see if your can get them to pay for it, since it was not properly described. Doing stuff like this can be a pain in the ass, but thats a risk you take when buying cameras on Ebay.
     
  7. reellis67

    reellis67 Subscriber

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    Good memory. The crack is more of a chip where it appears the thread likely pulled out like what you are describing. This camera never got abused though. Other than the chip on the bottom, it looks like I went back in time and bought it new from Gundlach, lens and all! I don't think it should be a big problem now that I've had time to take a closer look (I'm at work, so lots of free time, unlike at home!). What I think would be the strongest solution would be to remove the existing hardware, which looks a bit sketchy, and replace it with a T-nut. The chiped area should have no impact on the functionality of the mount, and I would feel better about it in general.

    I like the idea of a longer screw. I was thinking of making one that would have a longer reach for my existing head before I found the real problem with the mount, and I may still take your advice and make one anyway. I don't think I could replace my tripod though. It's been all over the world, to the tops of mountains, and just about everywhere I have been. I think it can handle the weight of this camera, at least for now, and I love the three way head. It works fabulously for my 4x5, and besides, I can't afford the Reis. I'll keep a weather eye on ebay for a heavier model for this specific camera just the same.

    Thanks for the help!

    - Randy
     
  8. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    As a former Korona owner, I suggest you replace the standard 1/4-20 insert with a 3/8" threaded insert and get a larger diameter screw for your Bogen head. I found the 1/4-20 kind of wimpy for such a big camera. I also ended up putting some adhesive-backed stair-tread grip on the wood surrounding the tripod hole because the darned thing would rotate every time I opened the back to insert the filmholder, no matter how hard I screwed it to the head. You can find it at any Home Depot in the paint department. It's a 3M or DuPont product with grit on one side and peel-off tape covering the adhesive. It's sold by the inch, very cheap for the amount you need.

    Peter Gomena
     
  9. reellis67

    reellis67 Subscriber

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    Peter,

    Thanks for the suggestion! I agree about the 1/4" mount, it does seem very flimsy considering the weigh of this camera. Since I am going to be beefing it up anyway, I'll certainly put in the larger mount, plus my tripod head accomodates 3/8 mounts already so I should be in good shape.

    That's an interesting note about rotation. I've not had a problem with my 4x5 so far but with the larger camera I can see how it could be an issue. The head that I am using now has a lot of surface area and is covered in rough rubber, but with the smooth wood, it might not have enough grip. I'll pick up some of your tread grip just in case. Thanks!

    - Randy
     
  10. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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    A less intrusive cure for the camera rotating on the tripod is to coat the bottom of the camera (or the top of the tripod) with rubber cement. Thin rubber sheets to help unscrewing jar lids are available in houseware departments.

    If you use a threaded insert instead of a T-nut on your Korona, consider epoxying it in place for added security. Unless the threaded insert is a snug fit, the T-nut will be safer. To avoid altering the camera. you can make a plywood plate which screws onto what is left of the tripod socket, and which has a T-nut to accept the screw on the tripod.
     
  11. Terence

    Terence Member

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    I used a larger t-nut (from Lee Valley) with the cross of the "t" at the top of the wood, so that when you tighten down it cinches the camera down on to the tripod head.

    This may be obvious, and what you intended to do. I mention it only because I saw a friend do the t-nut routine from the bottom of the camera and it ripped out the first time he used it in the field.
     
  12. User Removed

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    Or course the top of the "T" would have to be on the top. You would be foolish to put it below...it just would not work that way and would defeat the whole purpose!

    Coverting the camera and tripod to 3/8" is a good idea, but more work then you think I'm sure.

    Whatever you decide you do, I suggest using epoxy to put it in. You can do a clean job and actually make it stronger then the current piece in the camera.

    I've seen people use felt on the top of their tripods, or a thin piece of rubber. I don't know about the suggestion of coating the bottom of your camera with rubber cement...thats not a good idea at all. The grip-tape idea is good...however, alot of those grip-tapes have sand in them, and it can scrap up the bottom of your nice wooden camera!

    Ryan McIntosh
    www.RyanMcIntosh.net
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 1, 2006
  13. Harrigan

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    I would suggest getting rid of that head and putting something that has a quick release head, such as a bogen 3030 or 3047. The 3047 might be too big for your tripod but at least get a 3030 head on there. The reason being the tripod mount is often a weak area on the camera. If you have a quick release head you can buy multiple mounts and attach one to each one of your cameras. That way you never have to take it off and your not constantly removing and reinstalling the tripod, wearing out the brass threads. Brass is also quite soft, I would highly recommend you use a hardened steel t nut or stainless. Fix it once the right way and never deal with it again. Also if you put a tripod mounting plate on your camera you can also add a locking washer and nut to the bolt (from the opposite end) and make it very rigid (as long as you have room). With a standard 3030 mounting plate just remove the stock bolt and get a longer one. I have a 3047 head with permanently mounted tripod plates on my 8x10 and 30x40cm cameras and its nice to just pop them on the tripod. Also my 30x40 is as old as the Korona and the mount would never hold up to constant threading and mounting-remounting. I hope I've given you at least some good ideas, enjoy the 8x10!
     
  14. User Removed

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    Okay, well...I would NEVER suggest someone getting a quick release tripod head for shooting anything larger than 4x5...however, the suggestion above is actually a good idea. Personally, I HATE quick release heads and think they are the worst thing ever to use with 8x10 and larger cameras, but figuring your problem, it might be a good idea.

    IF you could just permanently bolt a quick release plate on the camera, and never take it off, you would not have to worry about doing wood working or altering the camera.

    Just make sure its a REALLY good head! All quick release heads I've seen and used have got worn out over time and slowly get weaker and get abit of movement in them.
     
  15. Harrigan

    Harrigan Member

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    I dont have any problems with mine but it does not get hammered and beat on either. I find its alot easier to get the big camera mounted quickly on the tripod with the quick release. I do have a big 6 inch 1/4 inch thick alum plate attached to tripod mounting plate for the beast camera for stability. Basically the aluminim plate is welded to the tripod mounting plate which is also screwed into the 3/8 hole on the camera. Anyway were talking about a Korona which is not all that heavy so a quick release plate might be ideal for a fragile camera.
     
  16. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    The hex quick release plate works great for my Kodak 2D which is simular, I have been using it for years, with no noticiable problems and no loosening on the tripod head, the 3047 is a pretty sturdy head..

    R.