KR64 in ID-11 part 2 - SUCCESS :D

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by IloveTLRs, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. IloveTLRs

    IloveTLRs Member

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    Encouraged by my last experiment, today I did another test roll of Kodachrome 64, expired in 2008 (stored in a freezer ever since.) I rated it at ISO 12 and shot it in an Olympus OM-2 with 50/1.8 lens. I'm not sure if anyone is at all interested, but here is a detailed breakdown of how I did it:

    KR64 @ISO 12

    Developing procedure:
    1. Dish soap pre-wash
    2. 12 minutes in ID-11 (not fresh and sorry, don't know temp)
    3. Stop bath (proper acid stop bath)
    4. Fix for 15 minutes
    5. Fuji Quickwash for 1 minute
    6. 10 minutes wash

    - I elected to pre-wash with some dish soap, hoping to get the remjet off. I agitated heavily for 20 ~ 30 seconds, then let it sit. When I poured the mixture out it was this nice honey color.

    - I developed in ID-11 for 12 minutes. Constant agitation for the 1st minute, then 10 seconds every minute.

    - Stopped twice for around 1 minute with proper acetic acid mix.

    - Fixed for 15 minutes. Constant agitation for the first minute, then stand for the remainder.

    - Fuji Quick Wash for 1 minute.

    - Rinsed and let sit in water for 10 minutes.

    - After the 10 minute wash, I took the negatives out and examined them. They appeared "dim", so I squeejeed them, and with that the remjet layer came off, and after a few runs it was almost completely gone, revealing some decent negatives. Some images have streaks through them, from what I'm not sure (left over remjet and/or scratches, I believe.)

    The resulting images are quite nice. Rather grainy, but good contrast. I've uploaded the image to the galleries, as well.
     

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  2. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Just developed a roll of K-64. I'm impressed with how they look. Just pulled the roll out of the fix, and wowwy zowwy, gorgious negatives. I prewashed with TSP, took three wash and rinse cycles before the water came out clear, no scrubbing needed. Fifteen minutes in D-76 stock followed by thirty seconds in acid stop followed with two clear water rinses then fixed(TF-4) for five minutes. Have them hanging to dry at this very moment, can't wait to print them.
     
  3. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    I'd read somewhere that the remjet can be removed after processing by soaking the film in a borax solution, then carefully wiping off the remjet while taking care not to scratch the emulsion side. Two tablespoons of borax per liter, I believe.
     
  4. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I used TSP and didn't have to wipe. I did a clip test and watched the remjet dissolve. I did the extra washes to insure it would be completely off the film prior to developing. It can be done after fixing, but I used it as an opportunity to pre-rinse.
     
  5. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    Is TSP alkaline, RIck? From what I gather, an alkaline solution will loosen the rem-jet. But being able to remove the rem-jet just by washing in TSP is infintely better than having to physically scrub the film. I hope you post some prints. I'll be interested in seeing them.
     
  6. gupa

    gupa Member

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    Rick,
    Did you use ISO 12 also. The no wipe idea sounds better, any chance we could get a peek?
     
  7. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    TSP (trisodium phosphate) makes an alkaline solution.
     
  8. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I shot at box speed, I'll be posting scans of prints later. I'm excited to see how it prints, thats the real proof of outcome.
     
  9. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Went into my DR to print the negativs, big surprise, the film turned red! I rewashed and refixed, then rewashed again. As long as the film was wet, it looked normal. When dry, the red tint returned. Processed another roll that my daughter shot, this time washing in borax. Same outcome, red film! I'm at a loss to figure it out. I thought it might have been caused by TSP, same result from borax. Maybe PE could chime in and help figure this out, or anybody else that has experienced this, please.

    BTW, the clip tests have a slight orange tint, nothing as bad as the rest of the film.
     
  10. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Okay, one more wash in dilute chlorine bleach, and rubbed hard, the last of the remjet came off. No more red mask on the film.
     
  11. michaelbsc

    michaelbsc Member

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    OK, so the upshot is that agitation in trisodium phosphate will almost clear the remjet, but it isn't adequate alone.

    Is that what I'm hearing.

    MB
     
  12. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Yes, when I read somewhere that a buffing wheel is used to remove the remainder of the remjet, I got aggressive and rewashed my film and scrubbed it witha terry towel instead of my cellulose sponges. Alot more came off. It's a real chore to remove that crap than it's worth.
     
  13. michaelbsc

    michaelbsc Member

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    Bummer. I was hoping it could really be dissolved with persistence.

    That bodes ill for homegrown ECN.
     
  14. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Persistant soaking works, at least so far. I have another test clip soaking, after three hours and two changes of solution it's nearly clean.
    Solution consists of : to 600ml water @110f, add one tablespoon borax, one tablespoon TSP, and dissolve completly. Then add enough cool water to make 1 liter, pour enough in a container to cover film and let soak. drain rinse and reapply once per hour until film is completely cleared.
     
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