Labels on prints

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by Mahler_one, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    I wonder if any here have a source for pre-printed labels that can be affixed to the back of the mat board ( or frame ) identifying the print as being completed by--- ( the photographer's name is printed here ). Moreover, I desire that the label be "personalized" with, for example, space for other relevant information that can be filled in, i.e., date and location of the photograph, etc., etc.

    Thanks.
     
  2. DarkroomDan

    DarkroomDan Subscriber

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    Off hand, I don't know of a source for ready made labels though I'm sure you can get them or have them printed but you can easily make them yourself. Office supply stores sell the blank sheets with labels in various sizes. The makers of the labels provide downloadable software that allows you to design and print what you wish. Take a look here http://www.avery.com I have used Avery and have been pleased with the results.

    Dan
     
  3. ROL

    ROL Member

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    As Dan has indicated, there is no reason not to make your own using adhesive label sheets with your computer and printer, with any information and blanks for specific data you wish to enter. I use these on the back of loose (hinge-mount) color prints (non-archival).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 13, 2012
  4. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Pre-printed and personalized doesn't make sense.... You mean custom printed?

    You could easily buy sheets of labels and print it yourself on your computer if you want customized labels. Avery labels for printers have instructions in the box that will tell you precisely how you'd have to setup your word processing software so that each printing fits right in the label. In the past I've done custom printed labels for work. I recall it was pretty expensive and minimum order was way more than what individuals can use.

    Also, be careful with the adhesive used with those labels. Many of them will dry up and peel (and fall off) in as little as 5 to 10 years.
     
  5. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    Thanks for the interesting suggestions....I will look into a label maker. Concerning the adhesive: Never on the back of the print, but on the back of the mat board, etc.
     
  6. Zewrak

    Zewrak Member

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    Considered having a custom rubber stamp made for you?
     
  7. ROL

    ROL Member

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    Yes, if interested in archival standard.

    I misread your question as labeling the back of the print itself, which I now understand was not your primary consideration. Rubber stamps, as Zewrack has mentioned, can be ordered cheaply on the net, designed with spaces to write in print–specific information. These may be used with non acidic inks to stamp either or both the print (loose, carefully on thicker papers) and mount board.

    Alternatively, you can design (which you will want to do even if you order a stamp) and print your own label "blanks" on any papers you desire, dry mounting them to the print, and/or of course, the mount. One jpg file created in a drawing program can serve all these ends. I print up pages formatted for 10 labels at a time both on 2"x4" adhesive label sheets (for non-archival uses), or fine linen 8.5"x11" papers. The linen sheets may then be tacked with dry mount tissue, cut into 10 individual 2"x4" labels ready for dry mounting (example: see Provenance, or here).

    And really alternatively, and perhaps best of all, one might consider transcribing information directly, especially if one has interesting calligraphic handwriting.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 13, 2012
  8. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    I sometimes print business card sized or slightly larger pieces using either Micro$oft Word or Publisher, cut them out and attach them tp the back of the backing board with double-sided tape. I have a postage stamp sized self portrait behind my Bronica and contact information as a generic template. I then add the title and usually a brief description of what the photo is, and the date taken. (I do that all on the computer, as my writing is abysmal!) I do date and sign prints on the back in pencil.

    Example with minor censoring:

    _PhotoID_Exampler_.jpg

    Making such stuff is so easy I find a tendency to keep redesigning it!
     
  9. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I assumed you weren't going to stick it on back of the print itself. You kind of said that in your initial post. But my point really was that many labels and such does not have very good adhesives in terms of longevity. They dry up, lose adhesion, then the label falls off. I know this because where I worked, we used a lot of them for storage box identifications. After few years, many of them simply fell off. I'm assuming you will be printing, mounting, and framing something for you or someone to treasure for years to come. I just wanted you to know, in 10 years, many of your work may be unidentifiable....
     
  10. ROL

    ROL Member

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    Coy. We'll hunt you down anyway! :bandit:
     
  11. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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  12. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    I use Adobe Illustrator to design my own labels and business cards then print them onto adhesive labels with my laser printer.

    You could use Photoshop but, if you have Photoshop (the REAL Photoshop and not "Photoshop Elements") it often comes as a package which includes Illustrator, InDesign and Acrobat. That's how I got mine.

    Illustrator is the correct tool for the job, anyway.
    I designed my business card with Illustrator and printed them out using perforated business card stock from Office Depot. Then I adapted that design to make my labels. I just downloaded the template from Avery's website and copied the business card file into the template. After making a few adjustments for the different label format, I was done.

    It's easy enough to do this in an evening's work, after dinner. I have about a half dozen versions of my design, prepared for different sizes of labels and cards. Everything from return address labels to quarter page stickers. Now, I just go to the store, buy the labels I need and use my ready made files to print them out. I can have dozens of labels, on demand, in just a few minutes.
     
  13. Michael A. Smith

    Michael A. Smith Subscriber

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    Forget labels. As others have said, they will fall off. Best is to write the information in pencil. If you are making large editions, use a rubber stamp, but othewise just write in pencil on the back of the print. And no fancy calligraphy, just simple printing except for the signing of your name.

    Michael A. Smith
     
  14. ROL

    ROL Member

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    The reasons some may wish to use label blanks, whatever their construction, include enforcement of consistent provenance, lack of good freehand penmanship and formatting, as well as ease of editioning. Inconsistency in process, whether in the lab or during presentation, can be the biggest challenge of any photographic artist.