Lattitude of FP100C

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by BetterSense, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    I recently got a 550 Polaroid back and shot my first sheet of FP100C45. I think this could really come in handy for verifying exposure and composition for important shots. Using my usual metering technique (guess exposure), my test-Polaroid turned out somewhat overexposed. I suppose this is unsurprising since I generally expose negative film with just a bit of a "safety factor" but I was wondering how much latitude this stuff has. If it's anything like color transparency film, then I should get a good negative exposure if I get any sort of picture at all on the polaroid, and the slight over exposure I saw today is nothing to worry about. But, I'm not sure.
     
  2. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Just like transparency film, it has none as you have no control over the diffusion process which converts the negative image to a positive.

    Latitude with a negative film is the amount you can get the exposure 'wrong' and then compensate for in printing.


    Steve.
     
  3. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    It will lead you away from your film's ideal exposure if you base the exposure on the instant print.

    It is a waste of money and time for checking composition, because you have eyes and can look at your image in the camera before you shoot. If you are using it in the first place, then you have time to do this very carefully, even with a loupe if you want.

    What it is good for is checking lighting ratios and other such things (besides just using it to take pix, of course).

    Positive materials have no latitude at all in and of themselves, if you consider the positive the final product. They have latitude in as much as they can be corrected in litho, Ilfochrome, or hybrid printing.

    If you meant "dynamic range" as opposed to "latitude", while I have not tested it in a controlled manner, I would say the prints have about four and a half to five stops of it. It is a contrasty medium, to say the least.

    Something with so little dynamic range, that is also a positive material, will obviously have very little latitude. It only has as much latitude as your chosen enlargement processes will allow, and, as Steve and I have already said, it has NO latitude if you consider the instant print to be the final product, simply by virtue of it being a direct positive product.

    Incident metering is the way to go with this material, IMO. If you are shooting the stuff in a situation with a luminance range of over five stops, you are going to dump either the low end or the high end. You can pick one to lose, or, by using an incident meter to effectively place your midtones where they should be, you can get [IMO] the most important part of the picture exposed well, and split the difference between dumping the high and low ends.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2010
  4. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    Why? If it's iso 100 instant film and I get a decent print from it, my idea of the proper exposure must be pretty close, especially if I'm using negative film for the "real" exposure. Plus things like bellows factor and slow shutters are compensated for.

    Yeah, I know I can look at the ground glass, but for some reason I always notice things when I'm looking at photographs later. Maybe I just need to slow down. But I think viewing instant prints would provide some insights as to how composition or lighting could be improved. At $3 a piece, maybe I should just bracket.
     
  5. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    I find that it likes a little bit of overexposure to get good clean whites. It has no lattitude, every adjustment you make to exposure changes the lightness of a print. Once it looks "good," that is the correct exposure. However, it's a little expensive to "test" as opposed to other smaller instant films. Use a meter and rate it at 80.
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    It is because it does not behave like your film. There is tremendous variety in films, and IMO the only one that is kind of like FP-100C is Fuji Velvia (now called Velvia 50, I guess). Even then, they are quite different. A light meter is the way to go for exposure. It is superior in every way (unless you like collecting test prints, which you very well might). An instant print will only get you a "pretty close" exposure. A light meter will allow you to get your "perfect" exposure. A light meter is cheap and quick compared to using who knows how many sheets of instant pack film at around a buck a pop, and taking about two minutes each. Hell, I got my favorite light meter for five bucks. If I wanted the modern generation of it, it would be $180 brand spanking new. That is CHEEP for such an important and fine instrument that will last you your whole life if you take care of it. If you don't want to use the more accurate, cheaper, and quicker method, I won't try to stop you any more. :D If Fuji is giving it to you for free, you have all the time in the world when shooting, don't mind if your exposures are a bit off, and like shooting and collecting thousands of instant prints, then go for it!

    I think if you are often getting surprised when looking at your film versus the viewfinder, you really do need to slow down quite a lot. It is all right there on the glass in your camera. Take your time. Use a magnifier if you have trouble doing this.
     
  7. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    If you have access to a 405 back, you'll find the difference in price between 100C and 100C45 might make it worthwhile to try your own testing for latitude. 100C45 is what, $35? 100C is $10. Of course, composition isn't testable this way as 100C is 3 1/4 x4 1/4, but the films have the same response to light and color.