Leaving A Partially Shot Roll of Professional Film in the Camera: OK or Not?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by BradleyK, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. BradleyK

    BradleyK Subscriber

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    With the passing of Kodachrome, I have, over the course of the last several years begun shooting d.....l for some of my color work. That said, for archival purposes, I have, when shooting subjects of particular interest, also often times shot the same image(s) on analog, specifically E100G and/or E100VS. My issue: Often times I may not finish an entire roll of film, so I end up rewinding the partial roll, making down the number of exposures, and reloading the film at a later date. Needless to say, this is an obvious nuisance; it is also wastes frames (a precautionary measure on my part). The question(s): Is is necessary to remove "professional" film from the camera if the film would otherwise sit in the camera for several weeks? Is there a limit to how long it would be safe to leave the film in the camera?
     
  2. fotch

    fotch Member

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    I would try to keep it down to a year or less, couple of months would be better, couple of weeks, not a problem.
     
  3. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Just keep the cameras with half finished rolls away from temperature and humidity extremes.

    Room temperature should be fine on most days in Burnaby :smile:.

    I am assuming you are speaking about 35mm film.

    Of course, this ties up a camera body.
     
  4. clayne

    clayne Member

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    Only an issue with medium format in that it makes loading reels slightly more funky where the roll had paused. Otherwise no issues.
     
  5. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    I've kept Portra in the camera for several months without a problem, although changes will appear it you go too long, especially if the film is exposed to high temperatures. In a cool environment, six months will probably be safe. I've also kept exposed Ektachorme around for a couple of months without a problem, but that was years ago.
     
  6. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Well, my personal choice is to never reload a roll.

    In other words, if I am done and have concerns for the latent image or film expiration... I'll rewind and process.

    If I feel like leaving a loaded camera on the shelf, I'll do just that.

    But I don't like risking the film for scratches "twice". And I don't like risking double-exposures. When I look in the kit for a roll of film, I don't have to check to see if I wrote a number on the leader.
     
  7. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    I'd agree with comments so far....a reasonable period, in reasonable conditions is fine, in my humble experience.

    But, if the pics are very important or irreplaceable, best to loose a frame or two and get them processed. Or, to be more economical and, as was suggested to me, have a list of those casual, trial or record-type shots which you never get round to taking, and use any spare frames for these.