Leaving shutter cocked on a RZ67?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Jim17x, Sep 16, 2012.

  1. Jim17x

    Jim17x Member

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    I was wondering if its ok to leave the shutter cocked on a Mamiya RZ67? Im hoping its ok since it has an electronic shutter instead of a mechanical one. Or is it possible to release the shutter after its cocked?
     
  2. Andre Noble

    Andre Noble Subscriber

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    Only the shutters closing is electronically timed. The shutter is still cocked using spring. I try to remember to release the shutter before storing my RZ lens.
     
  3. Jim17x

    Jim17x Member

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    Thanks Andre... I decided that my last shot wasn't worth taking yesterday after i already cocked the shutter and i didnt want to lose the frame so i just turned the RZ off. I will fire the shutter now and lose the frame so i don't cause any issues with the springs. Thanks again..
     
  4. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I thought the recommendation to release the shutter was for a LONG TERM storage.... Mamiya never said what constituted a "LONG" term but if it's just going to be few days or weeks, I'm pretty sure it won't be an issue.

    Anyone? I have an RB that basically has the same recommendation by Mamiya.
     
  5. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    I don't think I've heard of anyone bothering to uncock an RZ shutter for storage. Spring metallurgy is pretty good these days and the tension they're under while cocked isn't very different to that while uncocked.

    You don't have to waste a frame of film either. If you really want to uncock it, take the lens off, push the tiny metal button and then twist the cocking levers (one on each side, connected to each other) backwards. It'll take a few goes at figuring what to push/turn at the right time but you'll eventually get it to fire. Don't forget you need to cock the shutter again before reattaching it to the camera, so you'll need to have a body cap to store the body.
     
  6. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

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    I store my lenses uncocked. It's not that hard. Sometimes I get a reminder to cock my lens when I try to put the lens on the body. Not a big deal. Don't know if it makes a difference.
     
  7. kbrede

    kbrede Member

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    I don't have the manual in front of me but I'm pretty sure it says to uncock the lens shutters for storage. You just take the lens off, push the release pin and rotate the release levers. You can download the manual for free, it explains all this. Just google for "mamiya rz67 manual PDF," or something along those lines.
     
  8. landscapepics

    landscapepics Member

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    I think you could achieve the same effect (of uncocking the shutter) by removing the film back, turning the lever which use to rotate the back to M (which allows multiple exposure) then fire the shutter. Put the back on again but don't cock the shutter
     
  9. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Can't see how it can make any difference. The spring is still under tension when un-cocked. i.e. it doesn't go loose. Probably only a 10 - 20% difference between cocked and un-cocked stored energy.

    As the lenses need to be cocked to be removed and re-mounted, they are obviously designed to stay cocked when not in use.


    Steve.