Leica M2- Where to start film advance counter?

Discussion in 'Rangefinder Forum' started by asamimasa, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. asamimasa

    asamimasa Member

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    My M2 kit is finally set up and ready for shooting, and while a film advance counter that doesn't automatically reset doesn't bother me too much, I'm not quite sure where to start it. Do folks set it to ~38 and start from 1 as normal?

    Also, I'm a bit confused about the DIN/ASA dial on the back- did Germans have their own set of film speed numbers at the time?

    Looking forward to getting good use out of it this weekend!
     
  2. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    load the film, crank off two blank frames while making sure the rewind knob is rotating backwards, THEN turn the film counter until it is pointing at one. TAke pictures, rewind film, lather, rinse, repeat.

    The din/asa dial is because the Germans, at one time, used the DIN scale instead of ASA which is now ISO. A DIN of 21 is the same as ASA 100, DIN of 27 is the same as 400, and so on (or, in German, 'usw' = 'und so weiter').

    Nobody uses DIN any more, but you still find some old meters marked in it.
     
  3. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Actually ...

    The DIN and ASA standards were combined into the modern ISO standard. It continues to be correct to specify film sensitivity as 100/21 where 100 is the arithmetic sensitivity (as ASA was) and 21 is the logarithmic sensitivity (as DIN was).

    We most commonly see just the arithmetic part.
     
  4. asamimasa

    asamimasa Member

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    Just what I needed to know, thanks!
     
  5. Trask

    Trask Subscriber

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    And if we moved to binary code sensitivity, in our modern digital age, ISO 100 would be...1100100. Try fitting that on a meter dial!

    Now excuse me while I go push develop some Tri-X 110010000 to 11001000000!
     
  6. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    DIN = Deutsche Industrie Norm.
    ASA = American Standards Association.
    ISO = International Organisation for Standardisation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 25, 2013
  7. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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  8. Someonenameddavid

    Someonenameddavid Member

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    A question just flickered across my frontal cortex: it seems odd that DIN should be a base 3 logarithm... is it associated with the dB concept that 3dB is the difference in amplitude that is detectible by the human ear..( I dunno, not a physicist)

    David
     
  9. Peltigera

    Peltigera Member

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    I have a brand-new roll of Agfa Vista + in front of me and it states that the film speed is ISO 200 . 24ᴼ so the logarithmic DIN system is still in place on modern films.

    As I use a number of quite old cameras, I always use the DIN figure as the ASA system changed drastically in the late 1950s and meters from before then have DIN 21 equal to ASA 40, rather than ASA 100.

    It is not quite right to say that ASA was arithmetic and DIN was logarithmic (although that is correct) as the DIN system used (uses) a very different emulsion characteristic to measure film speed than the ASA system did. A large ASA difference in film speed between two films would not necessarily mean a large DIN difference. The DIN system (or degree part of ISO) measures a fixed density above the fog level while the ASA system ( and first part of ISO) is based on the gradient of the log exposure/density curve. It is at least theoretically possible for one film to be faster than another according to DIN and slower according to ASA.
     
  10. Xmas

    Xmas Member

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    The manual seems to say close baseplate fire two blank frames then set counter to zero?
     
  11. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    It is my understanding that when the ISO standard was put in place, the ASA and DIN procedures for determining sensitivity were replaced with a single, ISO procedure.
     
  12. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    +1

    A question just flickered across my frontal cortex: it seems odd that DIN should be a base 3 logarithm... is it associated with the dB concept that 3dB is the difference in amplitude that is detectible by the human ear..( I dunno, not a physicist)

    David

    Are you a robot?
     
  13. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    I always set the exposure counter to 38 and then wind on from there, but since most manual exposure counters go 0 to 40, that's the same thing as winding on two frames and setting it to zero I suppose.
     
  14. Nick Merritt

    Nick Merritt Member

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    Yeah, I usually set it at 0 after winding and firing the two frames. Why not set it to 1? I guess because I feel as though I'm getting a "bonus" frame. Stupid, I know.
     
  15. mhcfires

    mhcfires Subscriber

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    Me too.


    m
     
  16. Peltigera

    Peltigera Member

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    That is my understanding for the current ISO system - using the fixed density above fog method of the old DIN. My comments were regarding the DIN and ASA standards, not ISO.
     
  17. Someonenameddavid

    Someonenameddavid Member

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    Dammit Jim, I'm a doctor not a robot
     
  18. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Correct, but what he said will work.
     
  19. Xmas

    Xmas Member

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    mayhap but the manual says fire three blank frames is it ok to only fire two, have I misread the manual or the other post cause they seem different?

    note the strange question mark in both my posts.
     
  20. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Depends on how much of the film has been exposed to light. I get away with two, in all my 35s.
     
  21. Xmas

    Xmas Member

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    Thanks I'll stick with three as I frequently use PET film and can get some light piping.