Lens for an 8x10 camera

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by vintagepics, Aug 31, 2010.

  1. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    I have just become the proud new owner of a Eastman 2D 8x10. The body is in great shape as well as the lens, but the lens appears to be a late 1800's Magic Lamp lens. It works fine, but is obviously not the proper lens for the camera due to the vignetting that is occuring. Can anybody reccomend what I should be looking for in a proper sized lens for this camera? Thanks
     
  2. mike c

    mike c Subscriber

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    Keep the magic lamp lens it might work well for 5x7 or 4x5 with your camera with a reducing back which are fairly easy to find.12" or 300mm is normal for 8x10,coverage is important.Some lens have enough coverage for 8x10 and some don't.
     
  3. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    Yes, I will keep it, i like the vignetting effect. Thanks for the info on the lens size. I will have to start shopping around.
     
  4. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    As mike says 12" or 300mm, depending on the lens there are hundreds of different lenses that will work on it.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    go for a classic TR or wolly triple
    they don't cost much but the glass is nice
     
  6. mike c

    mike c Subscriber

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    I was just thinking vintaqepics,that if you find a lens before you buy it ask someone on Apug here.There are hundreds of lens out there and I bit there is many people here who have some knowledge of them all.
    Mike
     
  7. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    Thats a great idea, and thanks gang for all the info.
     
  8. mike c

    mike c Subscriber

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    Most of us hang out around here while waiting for our prints to air dry anyways.
     
  9. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    LOL, I know just what you mean. After screwing the pooch on 4 calotypes today, I started shopping for chemicals. Wow, that silver nitrate is expensive.
     
  10. mike c

    mike c Subscriber

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    Don't know if you like the older lens but Jim Galli has a lot of information on the older lens and also photo's taken with them,he is a subscriber here and look into his gallery,its really something.Also the Large Format Forum site deals with large cameras and lens.
    What ya making your own negs?
     
  11. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    A 12" Goerz Am Opt Dagor would be a nice option, I'm always amazed at the image quality of mine :D

    Ian
     
  12. Jesper

    Jesper Subscriber

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    Nikkor M300/9 if you want something small.
    But as others have said before, there are a lot of lenses out there.
     
  13. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    Nearly every lens you see in a Copal-3 will cover 8x10. For lenses in smaller shutters, you will have to look up the coverage in one of the various charts on the internet.
     
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  15. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    Thanks for the info Mike. Yes, Im making my own negs and everything. For the time being, im all over the place with dry plate, wet plate, and film, but seem to be falling in love with the calotype, not to mention the various types of processing. I started playing with my New Vue 4x5, and have been wanting a 8x10 for a long time. I figured the best way to start would be the Eastman 2D 8x10 since its the cheapest out there. If it continues to be the addiction that it is, then it will be time to move up. Its a bit like buying that first set of golf clubs from Play It Again Sports. If I stick with it, then the wife will let me spend the money to upgrade.
     
  16. photobum

    photobum Member

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    For me a 300 is a bit wide, but the Nikon 300M is small, light, modern and available. Did the Wollensak triple thing but when I got a 14" Commercial Ektar it became my only lens for 8x10. I have a 240 Schenider still mounted up but never used.
     
  17. John Kasaian

    John Kasaian Member

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    Heres what to look for:
    Kodak Commercial Ektar, 14"
    Kodak Wide Field Ektar, 10"/250mm(kind of wide)
    Ilex 375mm
    Goerz Dagor 300mm
    Goerz Artar 16-1/2" or 19"(kind of long)
    Schneider G Claron 240mm(kind of wide) 270mm, 305mm, 355mm
    Schneider Symmar 240mm, 300mm
    Wollensak Series I triple convertible(much preferred IMHO to the Turner Reich)
    Wollensak Velostigmat 12"
    Turner Reich triple convertible

    There are boatloads of other lenses, but these show up pretty often in good working shutters, anywhere from $200 on up (and up and up!) All are capable of outstanding photographs( if you do your part:wink:)
     
  18. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    Even though I love my 80m lens on my Rollei, in LF I find normal lenses to be too wide for primary use. For the 4x5 I nearly always use a 210 (opposed to the normal 150) and with 8x10 my main lens is 14 inch, 355mm as opposed to the 12 inch, 300mm lens. I do own both a 300 and a 150 but they sit unused. But buy used lenses and if you don't like them, sell them. Live and learn.
    Dennis
     
  19. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    I'm new to 8x10 too, also using a 2-D. I've been using the 12-20-28 T-R triple and a 240mm Dagor mostly, shooting paper negatives so far.

    Dan
     
  20. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    Thanks for all the info gang. Now that you have helped me with my lens homework, I wish you could help me make a better calotype.
    Fotoguy20d, what kind of paper negatives are you working on?
     
  21. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    Off the shelf so far - Ilford MG, both RC and Fiber. It's cheap and easy to work with. My first shoot with the camera was at a Civil War era living history - the paper, to my unexpert eye, seemed to yield a period authentic feel due to the red insensitivity. I want to try tintypes with it next - was going to try a kit from Rockland.

    Dan
     

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  22. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    Very nice. Is that a scanned reversal? What was your exposure time on that? I think I will try one of those paper shots to show you what my lens is looking like. I'd like to see it myself actually. I have one of those Rockland kits at home now, but have not had a chance to use it yet. Thanks Dan
     
  23. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    The image is a scan of the paper negative using a cheap Epson flatbed - 3170 photo. It''s a 1 second exposure through the rear cell only of a 1908 240mm Dagor. I think it was f16 on the scale so around f28. I expose the paper as ASA 3.

    Dan
     
  24. vintagepics

    vintagepics Member

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    Very cool. Thanks Dan, ill have to give that a try.
     
  25. anon12345

    anon12345 Member

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    Dan, sometime in the future and if you haven't already, you might try a yellow filter on the taking lens. It will surely extend your exposure time, but I have been shooting paper negatives in my 8x10 and noticed that blue skies were always overexposed. After testing with a yellow filter the clouds started to emerge, and the paper negatives started to resemble normal negatives. I was even able to pull detail out of the shadows that previously had eluded me when no filter was used. I'm still testing this method, but thought I'd mention.
     
  26. premo

    premo Member

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    Yes, one or two yellow filters have always been reccomended for ortho film, but if you like the pre 1900 look shoot without, as the non-corrected plates and film used then would not respond to a filter. And, by the way, ortho is the normal film. Pan is johnny come lately.