Lenses for Mamiya 645 1000S

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by kb3lms, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. kb3lms

    kb3lms Subscriber

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    I recently bought a Mamiya 645 1000S. What is the proper series of Mamiya lenses for this camera? I'm becoming confused! It doesn't use the same lenses as, say, the RB-67, right?

    I received an 80 and 45mm with the kit and would like to add a 150 or 210mm. Something longer. Suggestions welcome on a longer lens although I do not have any particular use or subject in mind.

    I'm new to the MF world, well except for my Yashica MAT-124 but that's a fixed lens camera. Most of my 35mm gear is Pentax.

    -- Jason
     
  2. Alan Gales

    Alan Gales Subscriber

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    Mamiya 645 cameras take their own lenses separate from the RB and RZ lines. I used to own an RZ but never a Mamiya 645 so I'm not an expert on them but I think there are more than one 150mm lens available including a leaf shutter lens. I don't know about a 210.
     
  3. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Mamiya 645 uses lenses designed for that body. I had 80, 55, and 150 for Super and Pro. As I understand, N series are the latest one for that body. Availability pretty much stops at 150mm. I haven't seen anything longer come up all that frequently. I think, KEH has them under Mamiya 645 MANUAL section.

    150mm is a popular portrait lens for that model. It's pretty cheap, too.
     
  4. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Well, I promised :wink:.

    The Mamiya 645 lenses can be divided into two basic types:

    1) The lenses that work only with the auto-focus film bodies; and
    2) The manual focus lenses that work fully featured on all the manual focus bodies, and with reduced metering convenience on the auto-focus film bodies.

    Your 1000s is from the very first series of Mamiya 645s, and is of course manual focus.

    So you have a very wide selection of lenses to choose from. You cannot, however, use lenses designed for the RB67, the RZ67, the TLRs (C3, C33, C330, C220 etc.) or the Mamiya rangefinders (6 or 7).

    The initial 645 lenses are designated with a "C" designation only. They are quite good, but getting to be quite old, and in some cases the lens coatings arn't nearly as advanced as more modern versions.

    In some cases, for some focal lengths, the "C" lenses were initially superseded by lenses with the "C" plus an additional designation of "S". The "S" designation refers to "short" (as I understand it) and featured a re-designed optical format that permits a smaller, shorter barrel. There aren't many examples of "S" lenses.

    The most modern lenses still have the "C" but also have an additional "N" designation. They feature more modern coatings and more modern styling. They make less use of metal for the barrels, and more use of plastic, so tend to be lighter.

    Most of the Mamiya 645 lenses have no shutter and rely exclusively on the focal plane shutter in the camera. There are, however, a few lenses that have a built-in leaf shutter, and are therefore well suited for use with fill flash. They have an "LS" designation added to their labelling. The latest, "N" versions of the leaf shutter lenses add the ability to be automatically cocked for each exposure if one has the right body, power winder and shutter cocking connectors. Otherwise, when used in leaf shutter mode, they require manual cocking for each exposure.

    In some cases, as the lenses have evolved through the various versions, their optical design has changed. In other cases the optical design has remained unchanged.

    In some cases, as the lenses have changed, their physical size has changed as well. The 45mm f/2.8 is a good example: the original "C" version is quite large and takes 77mm filters, while the newer "N" version is smaller and takes 67mm filters.

    For some focal lengths, there are no modern "N" versions. The 70mm LS lens and the 110mm f/2.8 lenses are examples.

    In at least one case, the maximum aperture available changed over time - the original 150mm f/4 lens was replaced with a 150mm f/3.5.

    The most common lenses - 55mm f/2.8, 80mm f/2.8, 110mm f/2.8, 150mm f/3.5 and 210mm f/4 lenses all use 58mm filters and all have barrels that permit use of the focus assist lever.

    Other lenses use other filter sizes and/or have thicker barrels that don't let you use the focus assist lever.

    I've had a number of different bodies and lenses over time, and all the lenses I've tried have been excellent, even though I prefer some over the others.

    Hope this helps.

    PS: this link to an index on Mike Butkus' excellent camera manual site lists a whole bunch of Mamiya 645 resources: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/mamiya/mamiya_lenses_accessories/mamiya_lenses_accessories.htm
     
  5. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    At the moment KEH shows several 300/5.6 lenses including a couple from the N series, and at least one 500/5.6, which says it takes 105mm filters! There's also an adapter to use Pentacon Six/Kiev lenses, but I think it requires manual stop-down.

    -NT
     
  6. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Excellent writeup Matt. I thank you and I'm sure the op will dig it also.

    I have a 210 that I use in manual mode on my 645afd and you can get these real cheap.
    I mention this because the OP mentioned that focal length. I think I paid just no more than 65usd and see them for that quite often.

    Thats one of the benefits of these kits. Excellent optics at really good deals presently.
     
  7. Alan Gales

    Alan Gales Subscriber

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    Jason, a 45, 80, and 150 would make an excellent kit for your camera. Look for the leaf shutter 150 if you do a lot of portraiture otherwise you can probably save some money with the focal plane version.
     
  8. rawhead

    rawhead Member

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    You want the 80/1.9 lens, not the 80/2.8 lens. A very special 80mm for sure.
     
  9. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    I'll agree with this despite the 80 f2.8 being VERY very good.
    I have both and if I'm shooting people, and wide open or close it's the manual 80 1.9 otherwise I use the 80 2.8 if I know I don't need the bowkahmachine. (there, technically I didn't say that dreaded word…exactly :whistling: )
     
  10. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    yes, but the OP already has an 80mm lens!


    Steve.
     
  11. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    He hasn't revealed which one it is :munch:
    yet
     
  12. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I consider the 80 f/1.9 to be more of a desirable accessory than the best choice for an all purpose, standard lens.

    Just as I do the 80mm f/4 macro lens, which happens to be the 80mm lens I own.

    But that is at least part due to the fact that the 80mm f/2.8 (or the 110mm f/2.8 that I use in its place) share the same small size, filter size and compatibility with the focus assist lever that the 55mm f/2.8, 150mm f/3.5 and 210 mm f/4 lenses do.

    Which just goes to show that the lens choice is wide enough to serve the needs of many different people.
     
  13. kb3lms

    kb3lms Subscriber

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    Matt,

    Thank you for a great writeup. I thought the 645 series were their own lenses. So, these are the lenses I have

    * 80mm f/2.8
    * 45mm f/2.8 (w/ the 77mm filter)

    They are both C series lenses. That they date from the 1970's would not surprise me. They are sort of heavy, but that really doesn't bother me because I really like the nice solid feel to them. The 1000S feels like it is built like a tank and no doubt it is.

    Unfortunately, the 45mm was dropped at some point in its life and the filter ring is dented. Nothing else seems to be wrong with it though, attesting to the solid build of these things. The seller included the 45mm as a "bonus" and didn't represent it as working.

    I also got the aluminum case, a hand grip, lens hoods and a whole other bunch of accessories. My guess is that it once belonged to a wedding photographer.

    The only problem I am having with the whole kit right now is that my 14 year old daughter is trying to glom onto it as fast as possible. She loves anything with a "twisty lens."

    -- Jason
     
  14. agfarapid

    agfarapid Member

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    I have the original 645 plus a 645 Super with the AE finder and motor drive grip. They are both great cameras. I've been using the 80 f/2.8, the 45 f/2.8 and the 150 f/4.0. The 150 is a great lens; even the earliest version f/4.0 (which I have) is a winner. If you are looking to round out your system, that might be your next lens. It's also very affordable.
     
  15. mweintraub

    mweintraub Subscriber

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    Nothing wrong with the 80mm 2.8, but the 1.9 is just magical. :smile:

    There is a 150mm 2.8 lens. Harder to come by and more $ than the f3.5 or f4 version.

    There are also Leaf Shutter lenses (55mm, 70mm, 80mm, 150mm) that can sync up to 1/500s for flash.