Less Known Printing Practices

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Hunter, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. Hunter

    Hunter Member

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    I was just wondering if you guys could enlighten me on some lesser know printing practices, in the light of flashing paper. A description on what it does, and a basic knowledge on how to do it/ a link to where I could find how to do it, would be fantastic.

    Thanks
    Hunter White
    flickr.mynameishunter.com
     
  2. trotkiller

    trotkiller Subscriber

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  3. Doremus Scudder

    Doremus Scudder Member

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  4. panchro-press

    panchro-press Member

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    There's a book, 'Lootens On Photographic Enlarging' which was once a standard reference. Lootens covers flashing and a variety of other techniques.
    I'm sure it would be easy to find a copy on the cheap.
    Dave
    -30-
     
  5. ath

    ath Member

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    Read Tim Rudmans "The Photographer's Master Printing Course".
     
  6. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    To clarify, there are a couple different meanings of the word "flashing"

    Dave referred you to Lootens, who talks about pictorially darkening the edges of the print by holding a card over the print and hitting it with a lot of light (example, 5 seconds of white light from a 7 watt bulb) as you move the card like burning. You do this without the negative, so the effect darkens distracting backgrounds. In one of Lootens examples, the straight print clearly shows the support structure of the backdrop. After flashing the subject is silhouetted with a dark clean background.

    The other definition of "flashing" is fogging exposure which brings the whole sheet of paper up to the threshold of turning gray but still remains white. This is a dim or short exposure to light over the whole sheet, and it helps print detail in highlights that might otherwise be blocked. This is the kind of flashing Doremus Scudder was talking about in reference to the Les McClean site.
     
  7. Helinophoto

    Helinophoto Member

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    Thank you for the tip, they just sold another book, thanks to you ^^ Ordered one from Amazon :smile:
     
  8. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    There are also a great many masking techniques that can be used, beside the common unsharp mask. Several of these parallel motion picture special effects masks, but others are quite unique to still photography.
     
  9. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    +1 for Lootens. He recommends a small bulb that you wrap with tape to dim output with testing to get a comfortable flashing brightness. I use one from a night light with a flickable on off. As well as varying repetitive movement of a blocking card. It's illustrated with images in his book.
     
  10. Rich Ullsmith

    Rich Ullsmith Subscriber

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    I think this kid might be thinking about photograms. I have some orchid photograms in my gallery, see if that's what you are talking bout.
     
  11. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    there are lots of alternate printing techniques ...
    i like to soak my exposed paper in water, then
    put it in caffenol C for 3-4 mins then in water again ..
    then i dilute and exhaused ansco 130 and watch what appears ..
    about 20seconds in, back in the coffee + back and forth as it finishes up ...

    this works great for paper negatives and cameraless images
    ( and maybe solarize ( sabbatier? ) images where you want
    control over what appears and how dark you want things to get ...

    no book for this, just experience ..
    john
     
  12. Maris

    Maris Member

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    An amusing experiment is the Emmerman process where photographic paper is soaked in developer and then exposed while wet. If the exposure is given in short increments with time for development between "blinks" a variety of pseudo-solarisation and self-masking effects will emarge. Different papers, RC and fibre base, graded and variable contrast, give widely varying effects. There are lots of variables. Be prepared for a wasted if interesting day in the darkroom.

    Occasionally something amazing emerges and nobody will ever guess how you did it!