LF lens ?

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by dances_w_clouds, Jul 23, 2009.

  1. dances_w_clouds

    dances_w_clouds Subscriber

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    I am a administrator of a photography program in Vancouver,B.C. And we receive donations rarely but I have one that I really don't know what it could be used for. It is a Wollensak 8.25" 210 mm f/6.8 Graphic Raptar Wide Field Lens on a 5"X5" metal lens board with .25 holes in each corner.
    I have been doing research on Wollensak lenes and the ones for a LF camera have a shutter with the lens. The one I have doesn't have a shutter on it. I thought it might be an enlarger lens but the 210 mm kind of blows that idea out of the water. And I have read that Raptar and Raptor are two different quality of lens as well.
    What I was wondering could this be a start of a construction gig for the winter or is it a lens to leave sitting in my drawer or use as a paper weight?
    Your learned advice will be appreciated. :D :confused: Thanks: Dennis S.
     
  2. Mike1234

    Mike1234 Inactive

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    I'm no expert but I do know it's from a large reprographic system that used a large electronically controlled behind-the-lens shutter. These can also be used with any Packard-type shutter. It should be a very good performer up to at least 8x10 at infinity.
     
  3. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    If you have a Sinar with the Sinar shutter you could use it: from back to front:

    rear standard <> bellows <> Sinar shutter <> front standard <> this lens

    These lenses were designed for the close range but can be used for portraits on 4x5 inch among things.
    You would have to experiment a bit with it: mount it on a 8x10 camera with a slow film and use a "hat" shutter.
    For experiments it does not have to be fancy.

    It is a good lens, so worth it.

    Peter
     
  4. Fred De Van

    Fred De Van Member

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    Why would a wide field lens be designed for close range work? Especially one which is of a design somewhat similar to a Schnieder 6.8 angulon.

    Wide field, portraits, close range, 210mm = optical contradictions. Makes no sense.

    Mike1234 might be on the right track..
     
  5. kfleming

    kfleming Member

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    I have one of these lenses which I had mounted in a Wollensak Pi-Alphax shutter for use on my 8X10 camera. The 210 mm Wide Field Graphic Raptar has an image circle of about 15 inches, it is small and lightweight, and mine produces exceptionally sharp negatives even at infinity. The lens is a reverse Dagor design, and was produced originally for use on graphic arts cameras. My copy of the lens was professionally mounted in the shutter by www.lensn2shutter.com. It needed a thin shim to ensure the rear cell was at the proper distance. I've used the lens with 4X5. 5X7, and 8X10 backs, and I have been more than pleased with the results. The recommendations for using a Packard or Sinar shutter--or simply a hat--make sense as a means for testing the lens.
     
  6. dances_w_clouds

    dances_w_clouds Subscriber

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    Thank-you for the input. When I Googled for information on this lens I didn't receive what I needed to know. This helped me and maybe I will join the group of LF users. ANOTHER G.A.S. coming my way but the hat idea might be my first try. More trips to Craigslist and the classifieds here. Thanks again. Dennis
     
  7. jimgalli

    jimgalli Subscriber

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    Small graphic arts printing shops needed a wide field lens to accomplish their work in a smaller area. Schneider was a big seller of wide field process lenses, as was Rodenstock.