LF Options

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by mrred, May 26, 2009.

  1. mrred

    mrred Subscriber

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    I currently have no darkroom, and my SF & MF get done in my kitchen with a light proof bag. Everything get's scanned from there. It's a condo life and it works for me, as I shoot 1-5 rolls a week.

    I would like to try 4x5 and still not have to deal with a darkroom. What would be my options?
     
  2. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    You could get a 4x5 tank, like a Jobo or Nikor, load them in the bag and tabletop develop them. I guarantee you'll need plenty of practice loading the reels, it's fun enough out in the open. You could even contact print them at night in the kitchen with a very minimum of equipment.
     
  3. Bruce Watson

    Bruce Watson Member

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    Easy enough. Get a decent film changing tent like a Harrison Pup Tent. This will give you enough dark and enough room to let you load and unload film holders, and to load a daylight developing tank. A Jobo 3010 tank like I use for 5x4 will do 10 sheets at a time, and if you get the manual roller for it it'll only take up about a square foot of counter space in the kitchen or bath -- so it's easy to find some space you can use for developing film.

    But beware LF. It's highly addicting! :D
     
  4. DannL

    DannL Member

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    Your really don't need a dedicated darkroom to process your film or prints. You just need a room/space that you can make dark temporarily while you are doing certain activities. There is a difference. I have a spare kid's bedroom that I now call the den. A stupid name, I know. "The den of horrors". I blacked out the only window, and I have a felt covered board that I kick under the door. It serves as a temporarily "dark room", complete with enlarger and all the necessary toys. In the summer I'll process in the garage either in trays or by drum. In the winter if I need to process prints or film I process in the "den" with a drum and roller. I'll do all the fixing in the garage. You can process film and prints up to at least 20"x24" by hand in a drum of the proper dimensions. A roller unit is not a requirement. There's a million ways to attack the issue and everyone's situation is understandably different. Some folks have nothing more than a closet or bathroom. Alexander Gardner, Mathew Brady, Sam Cooley had horse drawn carts. :D

    Cooley: http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cwpb/03500/03518v.jpg
    Brady: http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/ppmsc/00100/00170r.jpg
    Gardner1: http://www.nps.gov/anti/historyculture/photography2.htm
    Gardner2: http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/stereo/1s00000/1s00000/1s00000/1s00045v.jpg
    Misc: http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3a00000/3a06000/3a06000/3a06025r.jpg

    .
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 26, 2009
  5. DannL

    DannL Member

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    Sorry, I got carried away there. You don't need a drum that does 20x24" prints to develop a 4x5" sheet of film. That might be considered overkill. The link below explains the basics for doing film/print in the unicolor make drum. Personally I use the Chromega Daylight Processing drum with Uniroller Model 352. The drum has adjustable rods to accomodate 9x12, 4x5, 5x7, 8x10 film or paper. It also has less tendency to leak.

    http://www.largeformatphotography.info/unicolor/

    Cheers!
     
  6. Laurent

    Laurent Subscriber

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    I'm using a RedWing tent and a Combiplan, and it's convenient enough to develop LF in the kitchen.
     
  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Here in Turkey I load my dark-slides and Jobo 2000 series developing tank in the bathroom, I prefer not using changing bags/light tents for Sheet films as there's more chance of dust at the loading stage.

    Ian
     
  8. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    I use a CombiPlan Tank (http://www.badgergraphic.com/store/cart.php?m=product_list&c=241) to develop my film and a Harrison Tent (http://www.badgergraphic.com/store/cart.php?m=product_list&c=161) to load my Darkslides - but not at the same time

    However, if you had the 10x8 Harrison Tent there would be enough room to load the sheets of film into the CombiPlan and then use it as a daylight tank.

    Provided you have a Film/Developer combination that is 10+ mins the slowness of the tank filling won't give uneven development issues.

    Another alternative is a Jobo 2500 Tank and Reel (http://www.badgergraphic.com/store/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=1818)

    Ian Grant is correct about the light tent being a dust trap :sad: - you need to be very hot on the house keeping duties.

    Have fun

    Martin
     
  9. P C Headland

    P C Headland Subscriber

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    I use a changing bag and a Paterson Orbital. I've not had any dust problems, but then this part of NZ is not known for its dryness....

    If you have a suitable 120 tank, you could use that to develop the 4x5 sheets - do a search on the "taco method". You can develop either one sheet slipped into the tank, emulsion side in, or multiple sheets if you use rubber bands around the sheets. Just make sure you have the centre column in on most plastic tanks to keep it light tight. This was the method I used till I got the Paterson Orbital.
     
  10. harleygsb

    harleygsb Member

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    I use a changing tent and the Jobo 3010. The Jobo is very easy to load with the 10 sheets.