LF with flash

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by BetterSense, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    LF is slow, but even so it seems most LF work tends to be done with natural lighting or studio lighting. Supposing you want to shoot using a flash or studio strobes, how do you sync them?

    Some shutters probably have PC sync terminals, but mine that I have on my speed graphic doesn't.
     
  2. BenZucker

    BenZucker Member

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    The shutter on the lens of your graphic probably has two posts coming out of it, i think its called "bi-post" or something like that. I have a lens with this that I had paramount cords make a sync cord with the bi-post on one end and the fitting that goes into a Pocketwizard on the other end. Hope that helps.
     
  3. Thomas Wilson

    Thomas Wilson Member

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    If your lens shutter does not have sync terminals then I think you're out of luck. My older shutters have the two prongs to which I can attach a home made sync cord. The part that attaches to the prongs came from an old power supply cord that I cut down with a Dremel. The other end is spliced into a Pocket Wizard cord.

    The only time I have trouble is when I forget to cock the flash sync. lever.
     
  4. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    I have a strange shutter that does not have sync terminals at all. I assume it's common for LF shutters to have them.
     
  5. David William White

    David William White Member

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    Old fashioned way: Open the shutter on B, pop the flash, then close the shutter.
     
  6. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

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    Buy a new lens with a shutter with a PC connection. It's still not easy (the aperture being what it is), but doable if this is where you want to go.


    tim in san jose
     
  7. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    And if it's still life you can even keep popping :tongue:
     
  8. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    I recall that you use a enlarger lens on your camera- You can get a flash bulb unit thingy and then sync it to your FP shutter.
     
  9. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Copal, Prontor, and Synchro-Compur shutters usually have PC contacts, even if they're fairly old. Old Ilex and Acme shutters usually have bi-Post sync, and there are a few other odd types floating around. Paramount makes cords for just about all of them. Studio strobe packs often have household (H) type sync outlets and bi-post is the same as the two posts on a common electric shaver, so it's possible to connect a bi-post shutter to a strobe pack with an H-type sync cord using an ordinary electric shaver cord. Life must have been so simple when you could connect things like this with ordinary stuff from a hardware store, but who knows how much equipment has been destroyed by assistants who have plugged H-type sync cords into electrical outlets?
     
  10. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    You would have to use open flash technique. Select an F/stop for proper flash exposure. Enough ambient light to focus. Make sure your subject stays still. Use the shutter on bulb. Open it with a cable release--actually an air release with a bulb is easier-- and fire your flash; then close your shutter. Easiest way with multiple flashes is slave units fired by a hand held flash, again on open flash. Once you get the hang of it, it's easy.

    For large interiors, you can use one flash. Then painting with light (q.v.) with the shutter on T.